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Gloves for Winter Camping

Gloves are an important part of your winter gear.  If you are like me, your hands and your feet are the most important part of staying warm.  Once my hands and feet get cold.. that’s it.. I want to go home.
So I keep my hands and feet warm.  The way I do that is by using a layering system.
Three things that gloves do, 1.  Keep your hands dry.  2.  Keep your hands out of the wind.  3.  Keep your hands warm.
Here is a video I shot some time back showing my glove system.  Even though it is a little old.. these are the gloves that I still use today.  Once you get a good system and spend the money on good gear, you will have it for a long time.
Remember.. It is easier to stay warm than to get warm!
Have a Great Scouting Day!

Categories: Backpacking, blog, camp skills, Camping, gear, High Adventure, Skills, Winter Camping | Leave a comment

Winter camping tips

DSCN1915Its that time of the year when we break out the winter gear and head out for some chilly, exciting winter camping adventures.
I thought it was a good time to throw out some things to consider when getting out there in the cold.
We will talk more about winter camping in the near future, but this short list should at least get you thinking about your winter adventure.
1.  When setting up camp, find a place out of the wind and on higher ground.  Cold air settles in low ground.  Camp away from your water source, it’s probably in the lowest area and will be colder.  Get in the trees as best you can to get shelter from the wind.  Look up and make sure there are no “widow makers”, you know, those branches that will fall and put an end to your winter camping adventure.  Shake the tree a bit to drop some of the snow.
2.  Stomp out a tent platform.  It will make it easier to set up the tent and give you a solid, level place to sleep.
3.  Never cook in your tent.  If you need to get out of the elements, carefully use your vestibule as a wind break.  NO FLAMES in the tent.
4.  A closed cell foam pad (CCF) on top of an inflatable pad makes for a comfortable insulated place to sleep.  Fluff up your sleeping bag and let it breath for a bit before you get in.
5.  Pitch your tent tight to manage moisture.  A tight pitch will keep the rain fly away from the main body allowing air to flow.  A tight pitch will also protect against the wind and allow for snow to run off.
6.  Make sure to “empty” before you hit the sack.   Make sure your bladder is empty before you go to bed.  Don’t hold it because it is cold.  You need to be empty to stay warm.
7.  Drink a hot beverage and stoke the internal furnace before you settle in.  Eating a high fat snack before hitting the sack will get the body working for a warm nights sleep.
8.  Heat up water.  Fill up your water bottles with boiling water.  Make sure they are sealed up tight.  One in the sleeping bag will put out some heat for you and will give you water for your morning routine.  If you don’t want to put the water in your sleeping bag, put the bottle in a sock and store upside down.  It should be good to go in the morning.
9.  Put your fuel in a sock and throw it in your sleeping bag.  It will make it easier to fire up that stove in the morning.
10.  Strip down to your base layer when sleeping.  This will regulate temperature and make it easier to stay warm in the morning.  Jacket under the head area of the sleeping bag and boots under the foot area will keep them warm and ready for the morning.

If you don’t remember anything else remember this… It is easier to stay warm than to get warm.  Do what you need to do to stay warm.  Move, eat, and prepare for the cold and you will have fun adventures while winter camping.
Check back for more winter camping posts!
Have a Great Scouting Day!

Categories: blog, camp skills, Camping, High Adventure, Winter Camping | Leave a comment

Starting the New Year off Right

Happy New Year!
Starting the New Year off right for me becomes more and more important each year.  I’m not sure what it is, probably just part of the ageing process and gaining a better understanding of what is important [to me].
So as we kick off 2016 we look back and reflect of what was 2015, what made it a great year and what improvements can be made.  I don’t want to look to far out and presume that the plan will lead me to a great reflection next year, but as I set goals for this new year, the priorities remain the same and idea of making life better pushes forward.
I want to rant less, stress less, and control those things that I can control.  The good news is that 2015 was a great year for me and the family, which set up 2016 to be better than the last.  2015 solidified the concept of “the Ticket” that we teach and practice in Wood Badge.  Setting goals that are meaningful and driven toward the mission.  I have always been a fan and practiced what I preached, but 2015 was the culmination of many goals that allowed me and the family to be successful.  The same occurred in my Scouting life with the Troop.
We realized the idea of starting a “Group”.  Pack, Troop, and Crew are now moving forward and headed for great things.
The Troop is what I consider performing at it’s best to date.  The youth leaders are motivated and excited.  I am working with the best Assistant Scoutmasters I have ever worked with, and the committee is second to none.  The issue of being complacent has come up.  We won’t let that happen because we know it is there for us to fall into.  Always looking for new challenges and fine tuning the program so as to keep the Scouts excited and the adults willing to participate.  We are in a good place.
Looking ahead to this year we have so much to look forward to and there is so much to be done.  It is fun to be able to look ahead and set goals that we know will have meaning and ensure success for me personally and for the Scouting units.  The units have a great plan that will be fun and challenging.  It allows for growth and the retention of our Scouts.  This is exciting to be a part of.
On the homefront, are looking forward to this year.  Our first year of financial freedom and as the kids are all grown, time to spend exploring and having new adventures.
In short.. it’s going to be a great 2016!
We started the New Year off right!.. A fun snow shoe trek on Mt. Hood out to Frog Lake.  It was a crisp winter day, the sun shining and real cold temperatures.  A perfect day to get out and have fun

I am ready for a great year!  Goals are set and we are prepared to let the adventure begin!
What are some of your goals for this year?
Have a Great Scouting Day!

Categories: blog | 2 Comments

To be early…

timeclocks“To be early is to be on time…”  This is a saying that is often heard around Scouting and pardon me in this post, but one of my pet peeves.
I absolutely hate, yeah.. strong word.. but I hate this saying.  It does not send the correct message as intended.
The intent is to make sure that people are “on time”.  If a meeting starts at 7:30 PM, then the meeting starts at 7:30 PM. That is all.
The responsibility of starting the meeting or event on time is up to the person running the meeting, not the attendee.  So start the meeting on time.
The responsibility of the attendee is to be prepared for the meeting.  That would mean, be there on time ready to go when the meeting is set to start.  That would imply that the attendee would be in the right place at the right time in the right condition for the meeting.  Supplies, uniform,  gear.. whatever the case may be available and ready to go at the start time requested by the leader of the meeting.
To be early does not move the meeting time, nor does it ensure that the meeting will start on time.  Developing a habit of starting on time will.
“To be on time is to be late”… yes, that is the final part of this cute little statement.  No.. if I’m on time.. I am on time.  If I show up ready to go.
The message we teach our Scouts is to be on time.  In our Troop we start the meeting with the Pledge of Allegiance followed by the Scout Oath.  The Senior Patrol Leader does not say a word.  He stands in front of the Troop, raises his hand in the Scout sign, then Salutes and starts the Pledge.  The Troop in turn follows his lead.  He does this promptly at 7:30 PM.
If someone shows up late.. they are late.  No singing, no name calling or pointing of fingers.  If he missed something, he missed it.  It is up to him to get the information, figure out what he missed, and catch up.
The same goes for a Scoutmaster Conference.  We make appointments.  If the appointment is for 7:00 PM (before the meeting) the Scout is responsible for being on time.  At 7:00 PM if the Scout is not there, he will have to reschedule.  I will move on to something else.  It is not intended to be tough love or hard teaching, it is however a lesson in responsibility and they learn rather quickly.  The message is consistent.. be prepared and be on time.
So why a pet peeve?  I can not stand people that waste my time.  When the culture requires me to be early to be on time, it is telling me that I can not be trusted to be on time.  So what happens is a bunch of early people milling around with the expectation that the event will start on time.  It may be me, but I am sure that I share this experience with many of you that the event rarely starts on time.  That is all on the leader of the event. “We will just give a few minutes for everyone to get here”… NO.. I am here, lets start and let them catch up.  You just became a time thief and that is why it is a pet peeve of mine.  The start time is the start time.. that is all we need.
Be prepared and Be on time.
To be late is unacceptable, but to be early is to be early and to be on time is to be on time.
Thanks for letting me rant a bit.
Be on time.
Have a Great Scouting Day!

Categories: blog | 4 Comments

The Worthy Cause

acorn-wideAs I was driving home from work I was listening to a local Classical Music station.. it sooths me.  What I like about the Classical station and most talk radio stations is that they do not play a lot of advertisements.  This often goes without notice as you listen and enjoy the station but it is always noticed during those one or two times a year that the stations have their “listener-athon” or whatever they call it.  The annual or bi annual plea for funding to keep the station on the air and free of advertising.  Now there are many reasons I am sure that these stations try to stay away from endless ads, but it would also seem that the ads could remove some of the stress of “begging” for money every year.  Sure these stations receive funds from corporate donors and “friends of” donations, but by and large they rely on the listener, the end user, the person that enjoys what they produce.  It is a worthy cause to be sure… for the station and the listener.  It is free to produce what they want without being tied to this or that company paying for ad space or promoting their interest.  It is one thing to be “brought to you by…” than Company X paying holding stake in your product.. I suppose.  But a worthy cause none the less.
I, like many of you have many causes that are near and dear to you and what you do.  We get their pleas in the mail, most to only end up in the trash can.  They are all worthy causes and are in need of funding, after all it does take money to make most things happen.  I get mail from the Pacific Crest Trail Association,  The Non Commissioned Officers Association, the Red Cross, the National Infantry Association, various Alumni groups etc.  They are all worthy causes and at some point I donated, joined, answered their plea, or took interest in them.  I believe in giving to worthy causes.  I can not be an active part in all of them, so sometimes my contribution, big or small, is my way of fulfilling a need to support a cause.
Ok, by now you are noticing that I have not mentioned the Boy Scouts of America.  Well we will get to that here real soon.
First however I need to rant a bit on what seems to be an overwhelming theme with the “Worthy Cause appeal”.  The theme is that someone else will do it.
Someone else will donate.  Some “Big Business” will take care of it.. after all.. they can afford it.  Someone else should step up and keep this station on the air, or that trail maintained, or that museum staffed, or…
Someone else always seems to take care of your worthy cause.  That which you enjoy, take advantage of, or participate in.  Membership allows for that right?  I pay my dues.. I shouldn’t have to do more.  Someone else can afford to do more.
Time, Treasure, Talent.  We all have some, we can do more, we need to budget our worthy cause or causes into our lives.
You pick and choose what that cause is, we all do.  We decide what is important to us and those around us and make a choice to support it or just take advantage of “Someone else”.
The Boy Scouts of America.  My worthy cause.
For over a century it has relied on the stewardship of its members, Alumni, and those that know and understand what its mission is.  It takes money to make programs happen.  It takes support to ensure that the mission can be sustained and accomplished.  A mission that takes the life span of the member and will never stop as long as a 7 year boy comes to a join night.  It will forever need support and funding as long as Troops load up the vans, buses, and station wagons and head to summer camp.  It will continue to be in need of time, treasure, and talent as long as we wish our young people to learn, live, and share the values and make choices that shape their character.  Yes, a worthy cause.
But, Someone else will do it.
Each year the BSA asks of its members to become a Friend of Scouting.  To go above and beyond their contribution of time and talent.  To do more financially than their annual dues and registration fees.  To support the organization where it counts.  The worthy cause that is provided at the local Council level.  Where the Scout and the Scouts family benefit.  It takes more than registration fees and lending a helping hand at a local camp, it takes money, just like you local radio station that asks for support to maintain its programing uninterrupted by ads.
Yes the BSA goes to corporations and asks for their contribution.  The BSA targets organization that share our values and support our type of programing.  Buts not enough and we can’t rely on someone to do it.
We all know that Scouting is a worthy cause.  We all know what the outcomes can be because of Scouting.  We all know that Scouting offers programing that no other youth organization can do.  But we can not wait for someone else. We all need to do our part.
Budgeting your worthy cause.
I will not tell you how to spend your money.  My wife and I are like everyone else, we have a budget and try to stick to it.  We know what we have and what we can give.  We make a choice each year on what and who we are going to support.  For us, the Boy Scouts of America is our worthy cause.  We have seen what it does for the young men and their families.  We have watched as our sons took advantage of the all of the great programs the BSA offers.  From monthly campouts to the National Jamboree.  From Summer camp to Philmont our family has always enjoyed what the Boy Scouts of America offers and does.  So when we budget our giving we make a choice to give to our worthy cause.  We choose to support Scouts.  Our sons are grown and no longer actively in the program, even though Scouting will always be a part of their lives.  Now we support someone else, we have become that someone else that does it because someone else didn’t do it.  Like the radio station, I want Scouting’s programming to stay on the air.  I budget how much time I wish to give, how much of my talent I have to give, and how much treasure I have to give.  The bottom line is what we decide is our worthy cause.  The cause that means the most to us.  The cause that we see the most impact for our dollar.  And the cause that we know can last forever if we all pitch in.
What is your worthy cause.  Just because you are reading this does not mean it is Scouting.  I know that.  When I make our annual Friends of Scouting appeal to my Troop we ask that everyone help support a Scout.  We ask that they all do something to help.  A dollar, Two hundred dollars, whatever they can budget to help Scouting.  I ask that they take a look at their Scout and Scouting family and see the benefits that come with Scouting.   Finally I ask that they believe in what Scouting does and decide if it is important enough to them to keep it going.  I ask that they make Scouting a worthy cause.
Each year, we make our goal, last year we exceeded our goal and that is wonderful.  The best part for me is the understanding that the families of our unit make Scouting a priority and worthy of their giving.  This says a lot about them to me.  They share the values of Scouting and do not want to let “someone else” be the reason their son and the sons of families in the future enjoy Scouting.
Yes, it is a worthy cause.  Worthy of our time, our treasure, and what little talent I have.
Have a Great Scouting Day! 

Categories: blog, Character, Citizenship, Good Turn Daily, Ideals, Scouts, Service, Values | Tags: , , | 1 Comment

ILST.. what did we learn?

jonteachingIntroduction to Leadership Skills Training (ILST), for some of you it means JLT others remember TLT.. either way it amounts to training your youth leaders to make their troop better.  Each year we conduct our youth training with the goal of getting the youth leaders of the troop all on the same page, giving them a basic level of understanding leadership as it applies to them, and teaching them how to BE, KNOW, and DO their job as leaders.
This year we have spent a great deal of time discussing leadership at each troop meeting.  The goal was to move our troop from a great troop to a high performance team.  A team that believed in itself and was able to integrate new members without a step backward.  With an aggressive annual plan and some really great young men the year was a banner year for the troop.
This weekend was a busy weekend for the Scouts and adults of 664.  The day started with the annual Scouting for Food campaign.  Collecting food and then working for 6 hours at the St. Vincent dePaul food pantry.  After a great morning of service it was off to our meeting place for ILST.  The training ended with dinner and then the rest of the troop arrived for an all night lock in game night.
The approach this year for ILST was a lot different than in years past.  We had Scouts that attended NYLT (National Youth Leader Training) in the summer and so over the last few months we have called on them to pass on some of the skills learned.  We also provided opportunities for those Scouts to practice some of what they learned at NYLT.  This proved to be very positive and as a result much of what we normal cover during ILST has been taught, learned , and practiced within the youth leaders of the troop.
The Senior Patrol leader and I talked a bit about what we wanted to develop in our leaders this year and going into next.  We decided that we needed to know what our leadership styles are and how use those styles to move the troop to being that high performance team.  Not just doing our best, but making every patrol better and making a difference in the Troop.. so much a difference that we maintain a level of high performance.  So we narrowed our focus to two subject areas.  1.  What is leadership and the pillars of leadership that move our troop.  and 2.  What are the nuts and bolts of the stages of team development and how do we apply that at every level in the troop to ensure we achieve and maintain the high performance team.
We split the training, I took the first half discussing leadership and our pillars.  This is where we really started to learn about the young men of the troop.  Rather than lecture, we held a discussion on the five pillars of leadership that make our troop successful.
Learning to lead yourself, Focusing on the little things, Modeling Expected behavior, Communicating effectively, and being a Servant Leader.
As the discussion went each Scout provided input on what he believed it meant to be and know those leadership traits as well as how they would use them to make our troop better.  I was pleasantly surprised to listen as the Scouts really did have a good grasp of them and understood how they could make a difference in the Troop.
It was comments like, “if I can’t get me own gear together.. how do I expect the rest of the Patrol to follow me and get theirs together”.  Or perhaps it was “Do as I say not as I do doesn’t work with my patrol.”  Comments like that let me know we are on track.
Then the Senior Patrol leader instructed the stages of team development session.  He went through the Forming, Storming, Norming, and Performing stages as they are defined and shared what he thought they should look like.  The patrols then did an exercise that we use in Wood Badge where they each put together and share a story about a high performance team that they have been on and why it was successful.  We heard stories about NOAC (National Order of the Arrow Conference), our 50 miler in the Olympics, and the story of a Scout that finally found a fit in a new patrol that allowed him to make friends and increase his level of activity in the troop.   Again, I learned a lot about the youth leaders of our Troop.
Following the training as we sat and ate dinner, I talked with the Senior Patrol Leader.  I asked him what he learned.  He shared that he was happy to hear that “they get it”, he added that the final exercise we did when we asked each Scout what they were going to do to make a difference in the troop really spoke volumes.  Each Scout shared something that could really move the needle in our troop.  It was great to hear.  The coolest part was when the Senior Patrol leader said.. “Ok.. let’s do it!”
That was all that could be said to wrap up the training.  I thought about it a bit last night as I watched the Scouts have fun playing games and socializing.  They are a high performance team, then just need to get all the arrows lined up.  This morning as they cleaned up what looked like the mess that FEMA should have been called for.. it was an efficient process and well led.
I am so proud of these guys.
Another JLT/TLT/ILST.. what ever you call your Youth Leader Training…in the books and moving our Troop to perfection!
Have a Great Scouting Day!

Categories: blog, Leadership, Service, Skills, stories, teamwork, training | Leave a comment

The Character Habit

aristotle-quoteCharacter is that which reveals moral purpose, exposing the class of things a man chooses or avoids.– Aristotle
In other words, what we do shows our true Character.  For good or ill, how we behave is truly the mark of who we are.
We are what we repeatedly do. Excellence, then, is not an act, but a habit.-Aristotle
Excellence is measured in many ways.  Wins, a great batting average, achieving a Gold standard in the Journey to Excellence program, becoming an Eagle Scout, or raising your children to be great adults.  What is comes down to are the habits that your form to achieve excellence.  How can Scouting help one develop these habits?  Simple, but providing programs that move toward the aims of Scouting.  Keeping the Scout Oath and Law at the forefront of everything that we do in Scouting.  Ensuring that character, citizenship, and fitness are never missing when we reflect on the game we play.
The values expressed in the Oath and Law become those habits that drive us to excellence.  We measure that daily when we lay in bed at night and reflect on the day.  Did we help other people?  Did we make a difference in someone’s life?  Were we kind and courteous?  Were we friendly and obedient?  Did we do all we can to be someone that can be trusted and counted on?  Were we thrifty with our resources, our money, and our environment?  Do we ask ourselves these questions so that tomorrow we can be a better person that wants to be excellent?  That is how we shape our character and maintain it.
As Scouters, did we do something today to enrich the lives of our Scouts and their families?  Are we the role model to them?  What does that mean to you and what are you doing about it?
We are what we repeatedly do.  Can you honestly say you do your best?  I know it’s a struggle at times, but we need to try and try hard.  Everything that we do is seen by our Scouts.  They look to us to be models of character.  To them maybe the concept of character is still a bit foggy.  What they see in you will make a difference in how they develop those habits.
The greatest virtues are those which are most useful to other persons. – Aristotle.
The most worth-while thing is to try to put happiness into the lives of others.– Baden Powell
Have a Great Scouting Day!

Categories: blog, Character | Leave a comment

Black Friday.. Opting Outside

There was a lot of hub bub over a decision that the outdoor retailer REI made to close it’s stores nation wide on “Black Friday” encouraging their customers and employees to get outside on the that day and have an adventure. I LOVE IT. The fact that they value the life style that they promote in their stores and literally put their money where their mouth is. Yeah its gimmicky as all get out (no pun intended), but to me it speaks volumes about the kind of people the Coop are.  Did they take a loss on Black Friday… I guess time will tell, my gut feeling is that over the holiday they will more than make up for it because of this “event”.
But more importantly is the fact that I too decided to #OptOutside on black Friday, get away from the crowds and enjoy time out doors.
My friend Greg and I made plans to get out and camp for black friday.  We took off and headed to Mt. Hood.  Set up camp out by Barlow Pass and had a fantastic night in the woods.  We plan on doing it again next year.
There was a high of 20 degrees during the day.  We made a nice fire and just hung out, played with winter gear and cooked a lot.  Then we spent a cozy night in the hammocks.  The overnight low got down to 13 degrees and we awakened to a chilly 17 degrees.  It was a fantastic way to spend Black Friday!
The gear list:
Osprey Ather 60 Backpack
Warbonnet XLC Hammock
Warbonnet Super Fly Tarp
Hammock gear 0 degree Incubator Under Quilt
Army surplus cold weather sleeping bag (used as top quit)
Solo Stove
Trangia stove
Long spoon (Rei Lexan)
Marmot down jacket
Columbia fleece
North Face Hiking pant
Polertec fleece bibs
Columbia winter boots
Mountain Hardwear gloves
Standard packed items (compass, head lamp, etc.)
Here is a short video.  It was cold so the camera didn’t come out as much as I wanted it to.  I need to get better at doing that.

All in all it was a great weekend/overnighter and a better way to spend Black Friday.
I got excited with REI pushed the #OptOutside campaign out there.  It restored some idea in me that yes, they do think there are more important things than big sales.  Yeah Yeah.. they will surely come out of this better off.. but so will their employees and the folks that took part in the event.  I know it made my black friday better.
What’s it got to do with Scouting..not much other than to reinforce the outdoor program and the values that happiness does not always come with the swipe of the Visa card.
Perfect way to start the Holidays!
Have a Great Scouting Day!

Categories: blog, camp skills, Camping, Cooking, gear, High Adventure, Just fun, Skills, Winter Camping | Tags: , | Leave a comment

Triangle Thingies

Yes… Triangle Thingies.. that’s what they are called.  What do they do?  Well, if you are like me and want to have an enjoyable time when you get into camp you find ways to stream line your set up and take down.  No knots, no instructions, no fuss.. no muss.  If you look at my set up you will find that it is easy up and easy down.  The Triangle Thingie is a simple add on to the hammock that allows for quick set up and take down and the ability to have your underquilt hung in the same place every time without any adjustments.  This ensures a great nights sleep and getting it ready to hang super fast.
The Triangle Thingies are from a company in Idaho, a cottage industry owned an operated by outdoors folks that love to get out in the woods and hang and fish.  You can check out their site here.  The Triangle Thingies weigh in a 1 1/4 oz a pair and come in four colors.
Here is a quick video on how I installed the Triangle Thingies on my Warbonnet XLC hammock.
If you have any questions, feel free to ask.Have a Great Scouting Day!

Categories: blog, camp skills, Camping, gear, Hammock, Just fun, reviews, Winter Camping | Tags: , , , , , | Leave a comment

Lead to Performance

Forming-storming-norming-performing-300x159Show me a team that is not performing at a high level and I will show you a lack of vision.
The mark of a high performance team is a team that is heading in the same direction with the same purpose and goals oriented toward seeing a vision become real.  In the stages of team development we know that all team go through the four stages of Forming, Storming, Norming, and then Performing.  Some move through the stages and achieve that high performance level quickly while others seem to bog down on one stage or another.  Again, we can see the mark of a high performance team if they can move from Storming to Performing quickly and without the destruction of the team.
So, what are some of those obstacles that cause a team to fail or bog down?
Drama.  This is perhaps the single biggest obstacle in achieving goals.  People that are stuck in their own agenda.  People that do not have the team set as the priority and are not willing to put others before themselves.  Drama creates sub teams or groups within the team that begin to form camps.  This behavior is destructive.
Agenda.  When a team member is hung up or comes to the team with an agenda other than that which supports the vision of the team, the team will suffer.  We see this in Scouting when we have parents transition into our units with the goal of making their son and Eagle Scout.  While I understand the desire for every parent to see their son achieve this Award, it is not important in the grand scheme of things.  When that parent or group of parents crea
te this environment they put their desire over the goals of the team.
Lack of Knowledge.  This obstacle is the easiest to overcome but it takes willing participants.  We get a lack of knowledge or understanding when we do not know that goal and how to get there.  A lack of or failure to get trained.  A lack of or failure to embrace the goals of the team.  And a lack of “want to” to learn.  We all have busy lives and sometimes Scouts takes a back seat to other things.  Training tends to become less important to people that are busy and feel that the team and its goals are less important than themselves.
So what?
Every unit, no matter what that unit is, should be heading to being a high performance team.  If it is not, then why be a team at all.  Achieving goals and building the team up is a great way to build up the individuals on the team.  A Troop committee or a Patrol should be goal oriented and willing to put the team first
in order to accomplish those goals.  When we have Drama, Agendas, and a Lack of Knowledge the team gets stuck in the Storming phase or finds itself falling back into Storming over and over and eventually can not seem to pull itself out of it.  The ability for the team to move on is important without that ability the team is destined to fail.
The solution.  Be a leader and know what to look for in the stages of team development.  Be a leader and create an environment that does not allow for drama and keep agenda’s in check.  Be a leader and ensure that all the members of the team understand the vision and the goals and have an active role in achieving a part of the direction leading toward the goal.  In short keep the arrows all heading in the right direction.  Leaders provide Purpose, Direction, and Motivation to move their team toward being a high performance team.  A healthy team has good leadership that creates a positive environment that is completely goal oriented.  Creating this environment keeps the team focused and heading in the right direction.  That direction is high performance.  Once the team gets a taste of it, they never want to go back.
The bottom line.. Lead the team to high performance.
Have a Great Scouting Day!

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