Posts Tagged With: Patrol Method

Hitting the Reset Button

Well, it has been a long time since our last post.. I’ll get you caught up real quick and then move on to the subject for this post.. Resetting…
As you know if you have been following the blog for some time, my youngest son is a great football player.  The month of June was very busy for us as each weekend took us to a different college for visits or camps.  It was a long month and we spent lots of time on the road hitting 4 states and more than an hand full of schools.  Football season kicks off this Friday and it will be fun to see him give it his best in his senior year.  I am sure there will be more on that subject as the season progresses.
July was a busy one for the troop.  We went North to summer camp and had a spectacular time.  Before we knew it.. it was August and time to get ready for the coming year in Scouting.
So here we are… back in the saddle and ready for another great year.  This year wil mark our Troops 10th year and my 10th year as a Scoutmaster.  I am excited.  It is also a year of transition in our troop.  Over the last few months we has been seeing the natural attrition of leaders.

Two of the Assistant Scoutmasters have transitioned to leadership in the Venture Crew while I will be losing one of the Assistants due to the Non Discrimination policy.  What does this mean for me and the Troop… I am getting new Assistants.  I went to the Troop committee and asked them to support our search for three new Assistant Scoutmasters, and the search begins.
So what is it that we look for in an Assistant Scoutmaster?  Well, here are some of my thoughts on the issue.
First.  The leader needs to be able to work with kids.  They need to be friendly and approachable and willing to exercise patience when watching the Patrol method in action.
Second.  They MUST buy into the Patrol method and Youth Leadership.  If they don’t accept that then they can not be an Assistant Scoutmaster in our Troop.  This is key in developing leaders and having a Troop that works the way Scouting is designed to work.
Third.  They MUST be trained.  They need to go to all the required training by the BSA.  They need to make a commitment to the boys of the troop that they are willing to put in the time to help them be better.  Training is one way they do that.
Fourth.  TIme.  They need to commit to at least 6 of the 11 camp outs and be available on Monday nights.  A lack of commitment here and they can not be effective ASMs.  I don’t need Dads… I need help teaching, coaching, training, and mentoring young men.
That is the basic criteria that I have initially come up with in our search  So far I have one that has stepped up and will be a great fit.  
I am excited for this phase of transition in our Troop.  Fresh eyes, ideas, and attitudes that will make our troop so much stronger and bring more fun for the next 10 years.
Thanks for hanging in there over the summer and being patient with the blog.
Have a Great Scouting Day!

Categories: blog | Tags: , , | Leave a comment

Back to the Future… the Patrol Method

patrolmethodOk.. So to get back to the Future.. we need to focus on those basics that I referred to in the last post.  I am going to, in the next few post expand on what I think we need to focus on.  This is the world according to Jerry… and Baden Powell..
We start where it all starts and ends.. the Patrol.
The Patrol method is not just something we do to group boys together.  It is the method that ties the Troop together, it is the basis for teaching and coaching the three elements of Citizenship, Character, and Fitness that are the primary goals of the Scouting program in achieving our Mission.
Again, I turn to Aides to Scoutmastership and see what Baden Powell has to say about the Patrol method.

The Patrol System is the one essential feature in which Scout training differs from that of all other organizations, and where the System is properly applied, it is absolutely bound to bring success. It cannot help itself!

That is correct, if we do not use the patrol method we can not and will not be successful in our mission.  While other clubs sort their youth in age groups, gender groups, or interest groups, Scouting creates groups that will self govern, learn decision making, establish friendships, and challenge one another and the Patrols around them.

An invaluable step in character training is to put responsibility on to the individual. This is immediately gained in appointing a Patrol Leader to responsible command of his Patrol. It is up to him to take hold of and to develop the qualities of each boy in his Patrol. It sounds a big order, but in practice it works.

There always seems to be resistance in this area.  Some adults either have no faith in the boy, or find it easier just to do it themselves.  Which one develops the boy?  Give a Scout responsibility and training and he will rise to it.  I think you will be surprised when you see even a first year Scout lead to his level.  You will see his character develop as he is placed in situations that will test his strength of character.  He will have to choose right over popular, he will have to choose discipline over chaos.  He will have to take charge and responsibility and understand that his needs are secondary to those of the Scouts he leads.  He is first up and last down.  He ensures that meals are prepared and done correctly.  He develops communication techniques that allow him to effectively represent his patrol at the Patrol leaders council and get the information back to his patrol so they can be full participants in the program.  He is the cheerleader of the patrol, he is the compass that keeps the patrol heading in the right direction.  The Patrol leader is the motivator and goal setter.  At the end of his term, he will have taken a step towards being a better leader in his School, home, and among friends, not to mention in his troop.

The best progress is made in those Troops where power and responsibility are really put into the hands of the Patrol Leaders. This is the Secret of success in Scout Training.

Amen BP..   Take away the Patrol Method and you essentially do not have a Boy Scout Troop.

The Patrol Method is supported by the Patrol Leaders Council.  The PLC is the heartbeat of the Boy Scout troop.  Without an effective BOY LED Patrol Leaders Council, you do not have a Boy Scout Troop.  You have an adult led club.
The Patrol Leaders Council makes the decisions for the troop.  They plan the troops activities and meetings and by and large the training that will occur for first year Scouts and skills that are required for specific activities.  The Patrol Leaders Council is led by the Senior Patrol leader.  He is trained and seeks advice from the Scoutmaster.
The Scoutmaster’s primary job is to train that Senior Patrol leader.  Then he can watch as the SPL in turns trains and guides using the EDGE method those Patrol leaders.  A great opportunity for leadership development and training is the use of Troop guides.  These Scouts are part of the Patrol leaders council and assist the Patrols were needed, especially those younger Scout patrols.
The Patrol Leaders Council, I can not stress enough must be allowed to function, even when it’s ugly… the Scouts that make up the council need to be allowed to make mistakes, they need to be allowed to make a decision and then fully realize the consequence of the decision.  Adult leadership should stand back and coach when needed not allowing safety to be compromised or the general welfare of the Troop.  Using the assessment tools that are part of Junior leader training, or the new National Youth Leadership Training program. The Patrol leaders council can evaluate themselves and learn from success and failure.
This is the learning ground for Patrol leaders and will assist them is developing sound leadership, as rough as it looks sometimes.

The bottom line.  Back to basics.. back to the future starts with the Patrol Method.  Period.
As the founder taught us; “”The patrol system is not one method in which Scouting for boys can be carried on. It is the only method.”

Have a Great Scouting Day!

Categories: fitness, Ideals, Leadership, Methods, Patrol Method | Tags: , , , | 3 Comments

Zapping the Fun out of it

wallWe all get to a point when we hit the wall, reach the point of diminishing return, stop having fun.  Teen age boys seem to hit that point way before adults and that my friends seems to be normal.  So know what we know, how do we deliver that promise without loosing our cool, making Scouting painful, and zapping the fun out of it.
I have been giving this subject a lot of thought lately and it pretty much came to a head for me the other night at our Troop meeting when I had a little chat with a Scout and his Dad.  This Scout is a good kid, he is growing up and seeing where he can push and pull on the limits with his parents, school, etc… that to seems to be pretty normal, I mean, all kids test the waters.  They see were they can get away with things and what they will be allowed to do and not do.  But that is not really here nor there in the conversation other than to say, this young man is testing where he can and Scouting is becoming a push and pull point between his Dad and himself.
I remember when this young man entered our Troop, he was gung ho about Scouting and dove right in.  He quickly worked his way through rank and never missed a good Scouting opportunity.  Went to the National Jamboree and Philmont and has by and large been a good Scout.  But now he has a driver’s licence, a girl friend, and Scouting is not cool among the crowd he is hanging with at School.  Again, normal… right?
Like I said, this all has come to a head this week, the discussion about how we maintain a good balance for our Scouts without compromising the program.  How do we keep older Scouts engaged and how do we keep it fun and adventurous for them while we compete with the rest of their worlds?  How is that we keep them from reaching that point of diminishing return and get them to continue to make a contribution to the Troop?  How do we assist them in staying active as a member and leader in the troop?
Well, I may not have the answers, but I am willing to try to at least offer solutions.
I am, as you know, a big believer in the Patrol method.  I think that the Patrols are a big piece of the puzzle here.  Allowing the Scouts to maintain the Patrols of guys that they want to be with, share common interests and likes and dislikes.  Maybe if they stay together, they will rally around each other.  To much moving around and the Scouts start to lose interest in going through the stages of team development and maintaining that high performance attitude.
So let them pick and keep their Patrols and Patrol mates.  When they invite a friend, let that friend be in their Patrol.
Leadership is always an issue also.  We expect our older Scouts to be leaders.  And I agree, but to what end?  When they start to hit the wall, they are not affect leaders, they tend to go through the motions and develop bad attitudes.  If they don’t want to lead, don’t make them.  They will get their leadership time and I would much rather have a leader that wants to lead than one that is being forced.  Leadership comes in many forms and maybe just their example can be enough till they are ready to step back into the spot light of Troop leadership.
Attendance.  This one gets debated over and over again, and everyone has an opinion.  By the way, I am interested in yours.. leave a comment.  Here are just a few thoughts of mine regarding this issue.  I am not a big proponent of forcing Scouts to be there.  I want them to be there.  I also understand that life for these kids (and adults) is busy.  Sports, homework, vacations, friends, other clubs all pull at the Scouts and their families.  Don’t let Scouting be the thing that becomes the bad guy.  Make Scouting something they want to be at.  I have said it before, Scouting may not be for every boy and as their world pulls at them it provides an opportunity for choices to be made.  The more they understand the value of Scouting and the fun, the higher on the priority list it goes.  Attendance at meetings, outings, and other unit functions needs to be the choice of the Scout and the family.
But Jerry, how do you determine what “active” means?  Well, I always go back to what the Boy Scouts of America has determined as the standard.  Here is how the BSA defines “Active”:
A Scout will be considered “active” in his unit if he is;
Registered in his unit (registration fees are current)
Not dismissed from his unit for disciplinary reasons
Engaged by his unit leadership on a regular basis (informed of unit activities through Scoutmaster conference or personal contact, etc.)
In communication with the unit leader on a quarterly basis.
(Units may not create their own definition of active; this is a national standard.)
So that’s it.  That is active. I may or may not agree with it, and I am sure that there are some of you that feel that this standard is a bit chinsy.. but it is what it is.  That is how the Boy Scouts of America define it and that is what we must comply with when determining the activity of our Scouts.  That is the standard.
And so that is what I use as my guide.  Now, during the Scoutmaster conference I make it a point to ask what the Scout is getting out of the program… typically, you get out of Scouting what you put into it.  So once a Scout gets to that point where Girls, Gas, and Goofing off start taking a priority and troop meetings start to take a back seat, what is he getting out of it.  Does he still camp with the Troop?  Does he show up for service projects or courts of honor?  That would make him active, right?  I think it may.  The Scout will let you know how he is doing in the program, but we all know that forcing the issue on a teen-aged young man will result in push back.  And then you are back at square one.  The fun will officially be zapped out of it.
So what now?
First, know your Scouts.  What they like, dislike, and what makes them want to be there.
Second, use the Patrol method.  Enough said about that.
Finally, be flexible.  It’s only Scouting.  There is much to be gained in our organization, but if you are not happy here, or not here at all, you won’t get anything out of it.
Don’t be a Troop dictator.  Be as Baden-Powell said in Aides to Scoutmastership.. “To get a hold on boys, you must be their friend”.
Build trust in them and let them set their course for adventures in Scouting.
Hope that made any sense…  Don’t zap the fun out of Scouting.
Thanks for hanging in there and reading the blog.
Have a Great Scouting day!

 

Categories: Advancement, blog, Camping, Character, comments, Ideals, Jamboree, Journey to Excellence, Methods, Oath and Law, Patrol Method, Philmont, Scoutmaster conference, Service, Skills, teamwork, Values | Tags: , , , , , | 4 Comments

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