Just fun

Qualified, Trained Leaders

trainednewWe often talk about having all of our adult leaders trained.  When we speak of training we are talking about the basics.  Has the adult completed Youth Protection?  Attended their Basic Course for the specific position?  And according to the Boy Scouts of America, that’s pretty much a trained leader.
You are qualified to be an adult that delivers the promise of Scouting.  Really.
Ok, now… everyone just take off your Scouting hat and put on your parent hat.  Now you know nothing about Scouting except that your son wants to be a Scout.  You know that Scouting is a great organization that reinforced those character traits that you are teaching at home and he and his friends enjoy going camping once a month.  But who is this “Trained” leader?  What qualifies him to take your son out into the woods?
A couple videos?  An online training session and a “suitable for framing” print out certificate?
That’s it.
Oh, but maybe the leader has been to Wood Badge.  So he knows the Boy Scout Program and is able to teach and reach his goals.  He communicates well, but what of the skills he needs to take my kid into the woods.
My point here is this.  In a world in which we bubble wrap our kids.  We don’t let them stay out after dark, they can’t climb trees, drink from a garden hose, or in some cases even push a lawn mower.. we drop off our sons to people we don’t really know, they hop into their trucks and vans and drive away for a weekend in the woods.
Say that out loud and it is a bit creepy.
We trust that they know what they are doing with our kids.  We hope to see smiles on their faces and that they are in one piece when they arrive back at the meeting hall.
Trust.  That is what we have in our leaders.  But it’s 2014 so what has he done to be trusted.  What skills does he have to gain my trust.  Who is this guy taking my kid into the woods?
I am a big fan of Boy Scout Training and take it a step further.  I am on our district training team and teach the Scoutmaster basic course.  I am a Wood Badge staffer and love to teach leadership.
So knowing what I know, I know that the Boy Scout minimum training is not enough to build that trust.  But the leader that goes the extra mile and gets more training, now that’s the guy I want.
Not to toot my horn, or the horns our leaders in my Troop, but we respect that trust and that is why we all go the extra mile.
In our Troop, all the Assistant Scoutmasters are Wood Badge trained.
We have Certified Climbing instructors.
We have Certified Wilderness First Aid First Responders.
We have Wilderness First aid trained leaders.
COPE instructors
White water rafting guides
Leave No Trace master trainers
Kayak guides
Cold Weather camping experts
Backpacking experts
Pioneering instructors
Leadership trainers
Everyone is CPR/AED trained
Everyone has done the supplemental training for Trek Safe, Safe Swim defense, Safety Afloat, and Climb Safely.
I know that I am missing something, the point is that we go out of our way to be over trained.
This is where the trust of the parents is gained and maintained.
It is an important part of protecting our youth and delivering the very best program to them.
So who is your Scout leader?  Do you trust him or her with your son in the woods?
Have a Great Scouting Day!

Categories: Backpacking, camp skills, Camping, Character, Citizenship, Climbing, High Adventure, Journey to Excellence, Just fun, Leadership, Methods, Motto, Oath and Law, planning, Scouting, training, Values, Wood Badge, Youth Protection | Tags: | Leave a comment

Ask the Scout Executive

>#100DaysofScouting -100 Days of ScoutingOver my many years as a Scouter both at the Cub Scout level and the Boy Scout level, I have often heard folks grip about one thing or another when it comes to our paid Scouters.  I have sat in “town hall” or fire side chats with Scout Executives and other paid Scouters and bar none, they always become sessions that are filled with finger-pointing and questions that put the Scout Executive on the hot seat.  Some times deserved, but often times, just a forum to let them have it.
I have a pretty good relationship with our Scout Executive and see eye to eye with him on many issues that effect our Council.
So here you go… if you could sit with a Scout Executive, what would you ask?
List your questions in the comment section and I will do my best to get answers for you.
Note… this is not just for my local council.. I am sure that issues are pretty much the same all over.
So what do you want to know from the top?
Maybe if this works, we will head to Irving for the next round.
And go…

Have a Great Scouting Day!

Categories: blog, comments, Just fun, Leadership, Scouting | Tags: | 5 Comments

Looking back

 

Cooper2005

Camp Cooper, 2005 Troop is 2 years old.

I have been digging through my collection of Troop Pictures and wanted to find some good annual pictures of our Troop, you know, the Summer camp shots that show what a great year of Scouting we had.
As I dug through my collection I looked back on all of those young men that have enjoyed a great program at our Troop.  I think about all of the young men that have come and gone.  Some stuck it out to the end, some are still active with the Troop.
It has been fun to look at the guys and think about the funny stories that come with each of these pictures.
In light of current discussions on growth and membership, when I look at these pictures I see our program and why it works.  I see great kids that want to play the game with a purpose.  I see those adults that give a ton to the program.  I see the place we have been and things that we have done and it makes me want to give more to these incredible young men that join looking for the adventure of a life time.

Baldwin2008

Camp Baldwin, 2008

As I look back on these pictures I can’t help but remember those years when membership was booming and activities never seemed to end.  I think back on our transition from a “Patrol Box Troop” to a “Backpacking Troop” and how that changed our adventure.  It also changed our membership.  It made us a bit smaller, not every young man wants that kind of adventure.  I think about all the Scouts that we talked with on join nights and Troop visits that we suggested different Troops to.  Those young guys that had that look that they did not want to join our Troop, but for us them staying in Scouting was more important.  I often run into some of those young men and am glad that they stayed in Scouting.  Even though we did not ‘get them’ Scoutingwon and so did the Scout.  A look at the pictures bring back memories of attacking raccoon’s and awesome dutch oven cook offs.  They tell a story of our Troop and the fun that we have had.

Holmlund2007

Camp Holmlund, 2007

Doing an independent camp out in Eastern Oregon was a great adventure.  A staff made up of our parents and Scout leaders.  Trips to historical sites and learning to catch bee’s.  Water skiing, horseback riding, and launching rockets.  Hanging out in the stream and paddling rubber rafts across the pond with our hands.  Catching fish and having an amazing fish fry, for some the first time they ever had Trout.

Leaving an Order of the Arrow Sash at Chief Josephs grave marker was a special day and raising the flag on the flag pole we cut, shaved, and placed on the ranch property leaving the owner speechless with a tear in his eye is a memory I will never forget.  Troop 664 shined that summer and did something that I never thought we could pull off.  5 hours from home and one of the best summer camp experiences we have ever had.

Jambo2010

2010 Nation Jamboree

In 2010 13 members of Troop 664 went to the National Jamboree with Contingent Troop 720.  I had the pleasure of being the Scoutmaster for that Troop and Rob, one of Troop 664′s Assistant Scoutmasters was an Assistant Scoutmaster in 720 also.  The rest of the Troop went to Camp Baldwin that year and I do not have a picture of that group.

If you have never been to a National Jamboree you need to go.  It is said that the National Jamboree is a once in a life time experience.  Well, not really, you can go to as many as you want.  But 2010 was a special year.  Being the 100th Anniversary of Scouting in America, the Jamboree in 2010 was very special.  It was very cool that I was selected to be a Scoutmaster.  It was extremely special that my two sons were in my Troop.  It was the only National Jamboree that the three of us would every be able to go to together.  The young men of that Troop were very special and bonded quickly.  Those bonds remain.  That group will forever have a special place in my heart.

PSRTroop2012

Philmont, 2012

As you all know, Philmont has a special place in my heart also.  I love Philmont.  In 2012 our Troop put together two Crews and made the journey to Scouting’s Paradise.
It was a life changing event for many of the Scouts of our Troop.  That group of Scouts that made the trek in the Sange DeCristo Mountains came home different.  The other day we were talking about the guys that went to Philmont Scout Ranch.  Of that group all but three stayed in Scouting. 5 are or will be in the very near future Eagle Scouts.  The rest are still active in the Troop.  One completely turned himself around and became our Scout of the Year last year.  Philmont made a lasting impression on the life of Troop 664.  Last Monday I sat with a Scout, he was my Crew leader at Philmont, for his Scoutmaster Conference for the Eagle award.  We talked about Philmont and his impression of the experience.  He shared with me that at first he was not to excited because he was the crew leader and was afraid that he would be to busy leading that he would miss the experience.  On the contrary.  It was his leadership and the way our Crew bonded that made the Philmont experience a special one.  We talked about his experiences in the Troop and his growth.  He talked about Jamboree, Philmont, and all the cool camping trips.  Troop 664 delivered the promise to him and continues to provide the adventure of Scouting to the young men that keep showing up.

pigott2013

Camp Pigott, 2013

Last year our Troop went North to the Chief Seattle Council to Camp Pigott.  It was the second time we have been there and the experience was once again fantastic.  The camp is great, the staff is wonderful and the experience is always one that the Scouts talk about for year.  In all of this, as I look back though, it’s not the camp, it’s not the staff, it’s not the time of year.  It’s the Troop that makes these pictures come alive.  It’s the Troop that as it grows and passes along traditions, stories, leadership, and fun creates the wonderful adventure of Scouting.  That is the common theme that has run through the adventure of Troop 664 for the last 10 years and I am certain it will continue for the next 10… and beyond.
Finding that adventure in where we go and what we do.  In our young men and the dedication of the adults that go along for the journey.  As I look back at these pictures I can’t help but think that we are doing it right.  The proof, they keep coming back.  They learn, they grow, they become men of Character.  All of that wrapped up in this game we play.
Delivering the Promise is a unit thing.  Every unit needs to wrap itself in that promise and provide endless adventures for the young men of tomorrow.  I look forward to seeing more and more pictures of Troop 664.  I need to find the rest.  It is fun to watch the growth of the Troop.

How’s your adventure?
Have a Great Scouting Day!

Categories: Backpacking, blog, camp skills, Camping, Character, Citizenship, comments, High Adventure, Ideals, Jamboree, Journey to Excellence, Just fun, Leadership, Methods, Motto, Oath and Law, Scouting, Scouts, Service | Tags: , , | 2 Comments

…As our campfire fades away

fireAt the end of every Troop meeting our Troop circles up, joins hands, and sings Scout Vespers followed by reciting the Scout Law.  This has concluded our meetings for years and has become a great tradition in our Troop.
A couple of weeks ago a young Scout asked why we sing that particular song, since we are not really at a campfire.  He thought it was odd that we say “as our campfire fades away” when we are in a meeting hall.
I explained to him, and then the Troop that we always have the spirit of the campfire in us.  It is Scout Spirit.  There is magic in every campfire and we carry that with us every day.
The campfire within us burns bright showing the world that we are Scouts.
And that is why we say the Scout Law after we sing the song.  As the campfire fades we need to add more fuel to it to keep it burning.  As we send the Scouts away from the meeting each week we rekindle in them their fire.  We remind them that they have a fire burning in them and that they need to live that Scout Spirit using the Oath and Law as their Guide.
So we sing and remind one another of the fire inside each and every one of us.
This is a great tradition in our Troop.  I hope your Troop has similar traditions that make Scouting not only fun but meaningful.
What are some of your Troop traditions?
Let us know.

Softly falls the light of day,
As our campfire fades away.
Silently each Scout should ask
Have I done my daily task?
Have I kept my honor bright?
Can I guiltless sleep tonight?
Have I done and have I dared
Everything to be prepared?

Listen Lord, oh listen Lord,
As I whisper soft and low.
Bless my mom and Bless my dad,
These are things that they should know.
I will keep my honor Bright,
The oath and law will be my guide.
And mom and dad this you should know,
Deep in my heart I love you so.
Have a Great Scouting Day! 

Categories: blog, Character, comments, Ideals, Just fun, Motto, Oath and Law, Scout Law, Scouting, Scouts, Values | Tags: , , | 2 Comments

Backpack cooking- Patrol Method

Since word is out that our Troop is doing a 10 day backpacking trip this summer as our summer camp, there has been some concern as to how we are going to incorporate all of the “Scouting Methods” that normally come with the summer camp experience.
Well, I would first of all suggest that our Scouts will have more of the Scouting methods during our 10 day adventure than most Troops will have during your typical Summer camp experience, namely in the area of cooking.
Most summer camps offer a dining hall with cafeteria or family style dining.  This is great and takes a lot of pressure off of the Scouts during the day.
Our Scouts this summer will be using the Philmont cooking methods for our meals.  This will ensure that the patrols or crews will eat together, share responsibility, and eat the appropriate amount of calories that will be required on the trail.
I visited the Philmont web site and recalled a video we shared with our Crews before we went to Philmont.  This video basically sums up how we will be doing our cooking this summer while we trek through the Olympic National Forest.

Our Scouts will be eating on the go for breakfast and lunch, much like the Philmont experience.  We downloaded the Philmont menus plans for breakfast, lunch and dinner, to get a good feel for our planning.  It looks like we will pretty much stick to their plan.  Why reinvent the wheel?
Patrol or Crew cooking in this fashion will be a great experience for our Troop.  We are going to start using this method with our next camp out and continue to practice this through summer camp.  This means each camp out till July will incorporate our meal plan and methods for preparing, cooking, and cleaning while on the trail.  This should be real fun at Camporee this year.
I’d love to know how you all cook on the trail or in camp.  Leave a comment.
Thanks!
Have a Great Scouting Day! 

Categories: Backpacking, blog, camp skills, Camping, comments, Cooking, gear, High Adventure, Just fun, Leave no trace, Methods, Philmont, Scouting, Scoutmaster minute, Scouts, Skills, training | Tags: , , | Leave a comment

My Fire kit

It is a requirement for all Scouts to build their own First Aid kit.  This gets them in tuned with what they need, have, and how to use it all.  Being a backpacking Troop, building the personal first aid kit is an important task and requires a little more thinking than just band aids and mole skin.  The nature of backpacking takes you away from the cars and so the Scout needs to develop a kit that is compact, light, and serves his first aid needs.
In our Troop we also require the Scouts to build a fire building kit.  It should be compact, light, and serve the Scouts need to make fire.  Simple requirements right?
The ability to make fire is an important skill.  Fire is a motivator, cooking option, and method of warmth and cheer.  I was asked once what ‘survival’ skills we teach our Scouts.  I answered none.  We teach them to be prepared.  With a kit designated to build fire there is no need to rub sticks together or wait for lightning to strike.  The Scout reaches into his pack and makes a fire.
I carry my fire kit with me every time I enter the woods.  On a day hike or a 50 miler, the fire kit is as much a part of my pack as my first aid kit.
My kit is simple, light, and works 100% of the time to start fire.
I am not a fan of flint and steel or primitive methods of making fire.  I do not pretend to be a bush crafter and am not fascinated with that whole life style.
I use what works and that is it.  Again, I need not know how to ‘survive’ I will survive because I am prepared.
Here is a short video on my Fire Kit.
Question or comments?  Please leave them here at the blog.
Have a Great Scouting Day!
**NOTE- my batteries died twice in the camera and a part of the video I thought I was shooting was lost.  The SOL Tinders somehow got cut out.

Categories: Backpacking, camp skills, Camping, gear, High Adventure, Just fun, Leave no trace, Methods, Scouting, Scouts, Skills, technology, Winter Camping | Tags: , , , | 2 Comments

The Little Stuff

bsa-tentOne of the big misconceptions in leadership is that the leader needs to worry about the big stuff.  Yes, the leader has to know or have vision and that requires a look from the 1000 foot view, but when it really comes down to leading, it is the little stuff that matters.  The little things that make all of the big things happen or lead to big success.
Lets go back to our example we have used here of “The Tent”.
When we set up our tent there is but one correct way to set it up.  As a leader to ensure that the tent is set up correctly a look at the details, the little stuff, is important.
Is the footprint extended beyond the flap of the tent?  If so, it’s wrong.
Are the stakes in so that it will actually hold the tent down?  Stakes improperly placed will allow for the tent to be unstable, not tight, and ultimately not serve their purpose.
Is the vestibule staked out properly?  Are the vents open or closed dependent on the conditions?  Is the tent located in a good position to leave no trace?  Out of the elements?  In low ground?
Are the guy lines being used properly?
Are the storage bags put away or just blowing all over the camp site?
Is the rain fly on correctly or inside out?
Is the door facing away from the wind?
Is there food in the tent?
Is the gear stored properly (not in the tent)?
You see there are a list of little things that go into setting up a tent.  Multiply that by the number of guys in the Patrol and how many tents are set up and you have a lot of little things to look at.  When all of those little things are done right, everything tends to fall into place.
This habit of doing all the little things right will lead one to doing everything right.  Once the standard has been set, it is something that becomes routine.  Leaders check and recheck and inspect what they expect to see.
They first teach the skill, the task, or the method and then hold those that they are leading accountable.  Doing it over is an option.  Not correcting something that is wrong is not.  That to is perceived as a little thing.
I have heard over and over that “well.. that really doesn’t matter”, “they are just kids”, “give it a break, it’s only a weekend”…  It all matters to leaders.  There are standards for every task and when they are done right, all of the big things are right also.  All of the little things matter to make the big things work.
There is no room for lowering the standard, when that happens it to become habit and that is when things go wrong.
This example works for every task our Scouts are asked to do.
There is a reason we have our Scouts earn their Totin’ Chip before they are allowed to use a Knife, Saw, and Ax.  The Totin’ Chip program introduces the standard.  The consequence for not performing to that standard is the inability to participate using a knife, saw, or ax.
When we allow the little things to slide we set our selves and those we lead up to be unsuccessful.  Mainly because they will tend to do more and more wrong.  Once the idea that everything is expected to be done right is accepted, and the leader makes sure that the little things are constantly being checked, you will see success in the big things.
So how do we make that happen?  Training and accountability.
This last weekend we conducted Junior leader training with all of the older Scouts in the Troop.  Since we have been having some issues with leadership lately, I decided it was time to get back to basics.  The Senior Patrol Leader had the Troop pack up everything on Saturday morning.  The days activities started with the Troop splitting up, the younger guys went to shoot shot guns and the older guys began their training.  We began with a discussion on packing a backpack the right way.  We demonstrated what right looks like and then made sure that every pack looked that way.  It was a lesson on attention to detail and not taking the easy way out.
Then we went on a little hike.  When we reached our first destination, the leaders were given the task to set up camp using leave no trace principles.  They set off to get camp set up.  I instructed the Scouts that when they were finished to come and stand by me.  Once they all were there, we talked about the little things and making sure all of the little things were right leading to the big thing (camp set up) being correct.  Each Scout had to go to a tent that was not his and stand.  Then one by one they instructed the group as to what was wrong with that set up.  Each and every tent had something that needed to be improved.  Corrections were made and then a second walk through happened.  This time everything was right and the Scouts could see the big picture.
After a quick reflection and discussion of the process, they were instructed to pack and move to a second location and do it again.  The same process happened the second time, this time with fewer mistakes.  Again corrections were made, this time including the use of the EDGE ™ method of teaching [Explain, Demonstrate. Guide, and Enable].  And pack it up again.  This time with a pause to inspect the packs to make sure they were packed right.  If it was not correct, do it again.  Reinforcing the idea that there is only one right way to do it and we will not settle for it being done wrong.
When the younger Scouts got back from shooting their Troop guide did this process with the new Scouts.  Packing and unpacking, setting up and taking down.  He made it a game having the Scouts race each other and in the process made it fun.  The new guys picked up on it right away.  I overheard the Troop guide explain to them that doing it right the first time will save them time and energy down the road.  There is only one right way of doing things right.
The focus is on the little stuff and making the little stuff matter.  Little things done right make the big things right.
When it comes to older Scouts and adults, modeling the expected behavior while doing the little things right and making sure that the little things are always done right will set you up to being an effective leader and leading a high performance team.
Have a Great Scouting Day!

Categories: Backpacking, camp skills, Camping, Competition, gear, Ideals, Journey to Excellence, Just fun, Leadership, Leave no trace, Methods, Scouting, Scouts, Skills, teamwork, training, Values | Tags: , , , | Leave a comment

Going Camping

Merit Badges or Fun?Heading out into the woods this weekend with the Troop.  New Scout Patrol will be stepping off on the Trail to First Class, but not until after a fun morning on the range shooting Shot Guns.  Then the older guys will get to shoot all afternoon, but not until they develop some leadership skills in camp.  Modeling the Expected Behavior will be their theme for the weekend.
Weather calls for sun tomorrow.. we hope for the best.
So, I will let you all know how it goes on Sunday!
What are you up to this weekend?
Please share!
Have a Great Scouting Day!

Categories: camp skills, Camping, gear, Hammock, Just fun, Leadership, Scouting, Scoutmaster minute, Scouts, Skills, training | Tags: , , | 3 Comments

5 Reason’s I Hammock Camp

wbbbThis last weekend I got to hang out with some great Scouters at our Lodge’s Rendezvous.  A few years back a few of the guys became interested in my hammock set up, which I use every camp out.  Slowly the interest became more hammock campers.  This year there were about 5 or 6 hammock set ups that I knew of and it seems that the interest is growing more and more each year.
We got to talking about our hammock set ups and as we discussed this fantastic way of camping there were a few people who had lots of questions.  We all had our tips, tricks, and way we do it, but most of it was common.
Some one asked why?  Why hammock camp, after all, what’s wrong with tents?  So it got me to thinking about why I hammock camp.
Here are the top 5 reason’s I am a hammock camper.
1.  Comfort.  In a hammock I wake up rested and no sore body parts.  When you are laying in the hammock you have no pressure points.  Hips, Shoulders, and Back are all suspended in nylon.  Without the pressure points I find I don’t toss and turn and wake up well rested.
Using the under quilt and top quilt is warm and comfortable and easy to get in and out of.  Nylon and Down wrap around me and I feel snug as a bug when I am sleeping.
2.  Easy set up and take down.  I like how easy it is to set up my system.  The tarp goes up quick and my hammock is just a matter of two straps and buckles.  I can set up in a driving rain and keep everything dry.  The same goes for take down.  I can stand up under the tarp and pack my gear, take down the hammock and keep everything clean and dry.  Because all of the components of my system are in stuff sacks, everything is easy to unpack and pack.
3.  Leave No Trace.  I am a big fan of leave no trace methods and work to practice them no matter when and where I camp.  Hammocks can be set up places where tents cannot comfortably go, as long as there are trees.  Because I am hanging above the ground I am not leaving the impact that a tent does on the ground, nor am I restricted to tent platforms or designated tent sites.  Since I am not on the ground, I do not need to clear the area of rocks twigs and other debris that show I was there.  Tree straps are tree friendly.  They do not damage the trees and the weight is distributed so as not to hurt the trees.  If there is a concern about softer bark, I use the Philmont method of wrapping rope for bear bags in the I insert twigs around the straps to reduce the impact if there would be some.
Because most, not all, but most hammock campers practice light weight backpacking practices, I am reducing my foot print in gear and how I camp and think about LNT all the time.
4.  The Gear.  The nature of hammock gear is light and small.  Everything from the hammock to the tarp fits in small sacks and does not take up a lot of space in my pack.  The quilts are light and compress real small.  I never will be an Ultra light backpacker.  It’s just not something that I am willing to dedicate too much thought and energy to doing, but I am dedicated to being a light weight backpacker and the hammock set up really allows for that.  Along with the hammock, tarp, and quilts, hammock campers typically look at lighter solutions to camping.  Stoves, cook kits, and the other items that fill the pack are looked at carefully for its functionality, purpose, and size and weight.  Becoming a hammock camper got me into tinkering with gear and finding the “perfect solution” for my backpack.  This has been super fun for me.
5.  Hang anywhere.  I have found that I can hang pretty much anywhere.  I have hung my hammock inside of shelters, off of rocks, and of course between tress.  There never seems to be a place that I can not hang my hammock (except at Philmont).   I do not have to be uncomfortable camping in the hammock.  I noticed that as I started getting older that I started having a harder time sleeping on the ground.  Even on a cot at the National Jamboree I tossed and turned.  The weather, the temperatures, and the terrain are no longer obstacles in camping.  I can hang anywhere in my hammock set up.
Well there are 5 reason’s that I love hammock camping.  I am sure that I could list a few more, but it really comes down to comfort and fun.  I always encourage our Scouts to try new things and when they find that they like it, it adds to the adventure of Scouting.
I can say this… once you go to the hammock, it is hard to go back to the ground.  But Hike your Own Hike and do what you like.  I am a hammock guy and love it.
Have any questions feel free to ask, leave a comment.
Have a Great Scouting Day!

Categories: Backpacking, camp skills, Camping, gear, Hammock, High Adventure, Just fun, Scoutmaster minute, Skills | Tags: , , | 5 Comments

Firm Bound in Brotherhood…

Telling the Scouting StoryThis weekend was spent rekindling the fire of the Order of the Arrow in me.  I attended our Lodges annual gathering called Rendezvous.  Our Lodge hosts three major events each year.  The Native American Arts and Ceremonies Seminar, The Rendezvous of the Order, and The Leadership Development Conference.  We also participate in the Section Conclave and many service projects throughout the year as well and four Ordeal weekends and a Vigil Induction annually.  So, needless to say we have an active Lodge with ample opportunities to be an active member of the Order of the Arrow.
This weekend, I have to be honest, I was not entirely looking forward to.  I did not attend last years Rendezvous because I am finding it harder and harder to tolerate some of the behavior that we have seen at some, not all, OA events.  I suppose that I have an expectation that “honor society” means something and clearly that is not the case to some Scouts and their leaders.
Being elected into the Order of the Arrow is supposed to have some special meaning.  Our Lodge Advisor said it best last night at the Banquet dinner when he summed up membership in the Order of the Arrow as a Journey, much like the journey Dorthy took in the Wizard of Oz.  They (the principle parts of the the Wizard of Oz) sought a Brain, Courage and a Heart.  We too in the Order of the Arrow seek Wisdom in the Scout Oath and Law, We strive to be Courageous in doing the right thing, and a Heart for service.  And Dorthy.. she is the model of a Servant Leader, putting the other three needs above her own desire to go home.  It is a Journey to constantly seek the path that leads us to be bound in that brotherhood that cheerfully serves.
And here is the problem I have been having and I guess this is a universal issue within me that expects more out of those that we trust are “worthy”.  Whether that is a Scout that has earned his Eagle Award or a Scout that has been elected into the Order of the Arrow.  I expect them to live that code that we promise.  In addition to the Scout Oath and Law, the Obligation of the Order of the Arrow are tremendous guides for our lives.  It is that yellow brick road that leads us to a life that is worthy of being called good.
I understand the need for membership and so I understand that there will be Scouts that will take time to mature into young men that we can trust to live the obligation.  I get that.  But where is the coaching and mentoring that get them on the path to doing right?  This is my issue.  When I see Scouts that are disrespectful, unkind, selfish, and run from service, I wonder how and why they are members of the OA.  Or better yet, who is teaching them or not teaching them the expected behaviors that come with being a Scout and a member of the Order of the Arrow.
This weekend I attended for a few reasons.  First I was asked to do some service.  We cleaned out and sorted, repacked and labeled the bins in the Wood Badge trailer.  Since I was the last Assistant Scoutmaster for support and physical arrangements I had a great interest in helping out those future staffers, making their jobs a bit easier.  Second, I was asked to attend the Banquet Saturday night as I was “officially” being called to the Vigil Honor along with the rest of this years Vigil Candidates.  I’ll get right back to that.
The third reason was that we are trying to get the OA members of our Troop fired up again about the OA and rekindle their fire in ceremonies.  So I talked it up to the members in my Troop and a group of them decided to attend.  Being a good example, I knew that I needed to be there also to demonstrate that I care about the OA and their membership in it.
And finally, I knew that a bunch of my Scouter friends from around the Council would be there and to be honest, I wanted to hang out with them.  It’s always a great time sharing stories and catching up.
Back to number two.  The Vigil Call out.
Throughout the day on Saturday many of my friends and other members of the Lodge approached me with congratulations on being elected to the Vigil Honor.  Folks that I have not seen in ages and some that at other times have never given me the time of day, but the thing that mattered was their genuine attitude about what the Vigil Honor means to them.  They all shared a little something about what the honor has meant in their lives, not sharing anything about the induction, but what that simple little triangle of arrows on their sash has meant as they apply living what I gathered as the gifts they received from membership in this organization.  I kept thinking last night about this trip down the yellow brick road and that, even though I don’t know what is to come in the Vigil induction, I feel like it is that point in the journey when you finally meet the great and powerful Oz and much is reveled .  This journey from Ordeal member to Brotherhood has taken me on a trip to find the arrow.  That spirit of Cheerful service and living the Oath and Law fully in our daily lives… above and beyond that of just being a Scout.  To truly understand being selfless and applying that attitude every day.  One does not need the Order of the Arrow for this, but in the context of Scouting is a great life lesson that when demonstrated by those that have been selected to the highest Honor brings great credit to Scouting, this organization that we believe in and love.
I was looking through some of my collection of Scouting literature and found a small booklet that was distributed back in 1968 to new members of the Order of the Arrow.  It is a basic run down of what the OA is, gives the Legend of the Lenni Lenape and discusses the membership Honors of the Order.  There is a sentence in the paragraph about the Vigil Honor that I feel sums up my attitude about those Scouts that fail to live up to the expectation of membership.  The converse I suppose can be found in this statement, “…members of our Order who give outstanding or distinguished service, or who by unusual devotion to Scouting…”  Unusual devotion to Scouting, maybe that is why I don’t get some of the behavior or attitudes.  I have an unusual devotion to Scouting.  Yep… I love Scouting that is a fact and I constantly try to tell Scouting’s Story.  The Vigil Honor is calling me to do just that… I think.
I’m going to go with that for now anyway.
I am firm bound in Brotherhood.
Have a Great Scouting Day!

Categories: Character, High Adventure, Ideals, Journey to Excellence, Just fun, Leadership, Methods, Motto, Oath and Law, Order of the Arrow, respect, Scouting, Scoutmaster minute, Service, Values | Tags: | Leave a comment

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