Backpacking

Philmont Poem

philmontAs you all know I love Philmont.  I found this poem on the internet.  It is penned by author James Roberts.  As I read the poem it took me back… back to the Silver on the Sage, the Country that I love.. Philmont.
Enjoy…

Philmont

When I walk in the forest
In my backyard
During the day,
I feel the breeze against my head,
And I hear birds chirping,
And squirrels squeaking,
And rabbits coming right out of the bushes,
And deer walking slowly on the underbrush.

And, when night comes,
I look up at the night sky,
And see so many stars,
That they remind me of New Mexico,
Where that special place
Will always be
Forever in my mind,
The place I remember,
As Philmont.

It was Philmont Scout Ranch,
Where Boy Scouts
And Venturers
Come from all over the country
To go into the backcountry,
And loving the wilderness
That comes with it.

Philmont is for backpackers,
Who love to hike
And see the wilderness
And all its glorious beauty,
And for those who
Love nature
And cannot get enough of it.

Philmont is one of those
Special places for me,
Something that I will always remember,
And something
I can never let go of.

I remember Philmont quite well,
With all the wilderness,
And not a single person in sight.
I remember it well,
And I can share with you
Its unique description.

Philmont,
God’s Country,
As many people have called it,
Was inhabited by many,
Such as the Pueblo Indians,
Who inhabited the land for centuries;
The Spanish conquistadors
Who were looking for God, glory, and gold;
Kit Carson and the mountaineers,
Who shot and trapped their game;
Lucien Maxwell,
Who was in charge of the Maxwell Land Grant;
And Waite Philips,
Who owned the place,
And gave it to the Boy Scouts of America.

Philmont is more than the
People who just hiked the trails;
It is the experiences there,
And the wildlife
And the wilderness itself
That makes it truly unique.

How I remember the mountains,
And all of their rocky features,
Covering the horizon,
Making an excellent view when
You summit them.

How I remember the T-Rex track,
that monstrous foot
That once belonged to a monster
That lived long ago.

How I remember the wildlife,
All the birds that sing in the morning,
And all the crickets that
Chirp at night,
And all of the owls that hooed
In the darkness
And the coyotes that howled at the moon,
And the deer that
Wandered in the sunlight,
Feeding off the meadows,
And eating all of the grass,
Looking so graceful
In their wild herds,
With no fear of humans
Whatsoever.

How I remember the rivers,
That streamed through the mountains,
And all of their fresh,
Cold water,
That refreshed one
After he took a drink.
And how the meadows grew around them,
With their excellent beauty.

How I remember the meadows,
Filled with wildflowers
Of every kind,
Such as daisy fleabanes,
Oxeye daisies,
Dragonheads,
Primrose,
Roses,
Sneezeweeds of every sort,
Smartweeds,
Buttercups,
Lilies of every specimen,
Sunflowers,
Vanity Fleabanes,
And Black-eyed Susans,
With all sorts of flowers
To even dream of,
Making a landscape
That looked like a painting
That someone like
Claude Monet
or Vincent Van Gogh
Would paint
To his desire.

How I remember the vegetation,
The beautiful trees that existed,
Including the aspens,
And the pines,
And the oaks,
And the birches,
And the maples,
And the chestnut trees,
And the firs,
And the spruces,
And the beautiful trees
That hold every sort of wildlife
Imaginable.

How I remember Mt. Baldy,
And the great view from up top
The great rocky mountain,
The Rocky Mountain of the Rocky Mountains,
With the greatest climb,
Up to 12,000 feet,
In which there was everything to see,
For I remember the great view,
All the beautiful mountains beneath us,
And the trail that took us down,
And the towns that one could see from
Far away,
And all the people walking in the distance,
Making their way up top,
Or looking like periods from so far away,
That they seemed to be about their daily lives.

How I remember the Tooth of Time,
That crazy molar that existed
Atop of a rock,
That we climbed at 4: 00 am,
Just to see the sunrise,
But we made it at 10,000 ft,
And saw the morning sunrise,
And how I remember seeing Cimarron,
The village right below,
And Base Camp,
Where we would be heading that morning,
And all the traffic that was there,
As well.

The sunrise was so beautiful,
From what I could see,
I saw the glowing first light,
And then the big ball of fire,
Creeping into the night sky,
Lighting the world,
As morning came to be.

How I remember the tall tales,
Of those who were there before us,
Such as the loggers
Who worked for the Continental Logging Company,
Who worked for days and nights,
With little pay and little rest,
And not much food to eat;
The Pueblano Boys who started their first union,
Who fought for their rights,
But then the company went out of business
In 1932,
And there was nothing left for them;
The Miners who worked for French Henry,
Who dug the gold out of Aztec Ponil
In 1922,
And suffered many hardships,
As many of them died,
For they had nothing left,
Or even to live on;
The ranchers who lived at Clarke’s Fork,
Who branded all their cattle,
And branded all of their horses,
In 1951,
And ran their business better
Than any of the miners or loggers did,
For they all had a better share
Than any of their predecessors;
The railmen who worked on the railroad,
Throughout the 1870s,
Who worked day and night,
Assembled many,
And suffered hardships,
And many deaths;
And the Risches,
The pioneers,
Who came down in 1898,
Who wanted freedom
And a new life,
And started a settlement
On land of their own.

All these people had big dreams,
But they all suffered,
And they all made it,
Somehow or another.

How I remember the mini-bears,
Those things that steal your food,
For they are aggressive little things,
And they steal your food no matter what.
What are they, you ask?
Well, they’re the rodents of the forest
And of the meadow,
Whether they be the chipmunks in the ground,
The squirrels in the trees,
The mice in the abandoned cabin,
The rabbits in the burrow,
The weasels in the den,
The gophers in the ranch,
The prairie dogs in the desert,
The groundhogs in the forest,
The rats in the trees,
The beavers in the river,
The muskrat in the pond,
Or the raccoons in the treetrunk.
The always like to steal your food,
No matter what,
So you better look out,
Or they will surely get you.

How I remember the Red Roof Inn,
That awful thing they call a loo,
Where smells worse than B.O.
Cause one to throw up,
And where defecation and TP,
Go inside the pit,
Where decomposition is
Good for the environment,
And the ecosystem,
They claim,
And where there are walls back-to-back,
And there are two-person pilot planes,
And there are no walls
And exposure to the wilderness;
For they are the most awful
But necessary
Piece of hardware out there.

How I remember the BO,
Since we could not wear deodorant,
And we had to hide the smellables,
For how much I knew we stank,
And we had limited showers,
It was Jack London calling us,
And I felt just like him,
As he was inspired
With ‘Call of the Wild’.

Philmont is God’s Country,
‘Tis a place I shall never forget,
With all of its beauty and majesty,
There is nothing that could beat it,
And it is special due to its experience,
And everything that happened,
I loved every minute of it,
And go back to God’s Country,
Once again,
For God is always watching over us,
As we go to that beloved place
That we call Scouting Paradise.

James Roberts

 

Categories: Backpacking, camp skills, Camping, High Adventure, Philmont | Tags: , , | Leave a comment

Unit Culture

IMG_2059Monday night our Troop held its annual Order of the Arrow election and its six month youth leadership election.  Our Troop elections are like most Troops in that we hold the elections for youth leadership.  We may differ in this aspect, we only elect the “assistants”.  When we hold our elections every six months we elect the Assistant Senior Patrol Leader and the Assistant Patrol Leaders.  The idea here is that now the Assistant has six months to learn how to do the job, then he is more successful when it comes his turn to serve as the ‘Leader’.  At the six month mark, the Assistant automatically becomes the leader and we elect new Assistants.
It’s pretty simple and works very well.
The OA elections are held just like everyone elects members into the Order of the Arrow.  We do not announce the candidates until they are called out at Camporee.
After the meeting on Monday night a group of Scouts and I were talking about leadership issues and the OA.  I shared a story about how my ordeal went when I was a youth compared to how they do them now.  There are some differences for sure, but the spirit of the ordeal is pretty much the same.  A couple of the Scouts mentioned that they wish that the ordeal was still like it was when I was a Scout.  Now to be sure, I know that there is some form of “it’s cool if the Scoutmaster says it’s cool” going on here.  Rest assured I am not saying this to stroke my ego, and there will be a point here I promise.
We talked about how sometimes it seems that some Scouts take things like the ordeal serious, while others do it to get a sash and pocket flap.  I asked why they think that is.  The overwhelming response was that it is cool to be in the OA, but members should be “worthy” to be in it.  If they do not want to participate, they should not be in it.
I agree, but understand that to some the OA may be just another thing in Scouting and it certainly looks great on the Scouting resume.
One of the Scouts chimed in that he viewed it kind of like the different Troops we see at Camporee.  Some take the wearing of the Scout uniform serious, while other look like slobs (his words not mine, although I agree).  Some like to build the gateways, while others would rather hang out in camp around the campfire.  I am not sure that there is a right or wrong answer here other than when we discuss methods, like wearing the uniform, but what I suggested to these Scouts was that it comes down to their unit’s culture.
And how is that formed?  Well, I think that somewhere along the way we form our culture by the activities we do, the way we develop traditions, and our attitudes toward how delivering the promise of Scouting should look.  The Troop’s program has a lot to do with that also in that it becomes the style of the Troop.
So in the case of my Troop we have Traditions that passed on as the Scouts move through the unit.  New Traditions meet the older ones and it helps shape our culture.  Our Troop’s annual program goes along way in the shaping of that culture.  Being a backpacking Troop, we do things a bit different and the Scouts of the Troop view themselves as adventurous and skilled.  This adventurous spirit and skills are the personality of the Troop.  They like the idea that they are different from most Troops, especially at Camporee and summer camp.  They like to show up with nothing but their packs.  This attitude is a big part of our culture.  It is not right or wrong, it’s who we are.
Where does that come from?  Well, certainly I had a part to play.  Introducing the Troop to backpacking, but then the Scouts took it because they liked it.  As a Backpacking Troop it lends itself to adventures like Climbing, Kayaking and Canoeing, Glacier hiking, snow shoeing and lots of other  adventurous activity.  It is not for everyone and we have seen Scouts come and go because of who we are.  And that is ok.
We decided awhile ago that we would deliver the promise of Scouting and this would be our delivery method.  The Parents of our Scouts see that what we do works and those Scouts that stick around and take an active part in the program get a lot out of it.
We find a good balance of Youth leadership and Adult interaction through Coaching and Mentoring.  When our youth cross over into the Troop they immediately learn who is in charge, the SPL and their Patrol leader.  They never stop hearing it.  The endless stream of Scouts seeking attention is more often time met with “Ask the SPL”.  The culture of the youth led troop balanced with the ability to know when the Scout needs more than just the Senior Patrol leader.
The Scoutmaster conference is a big part of our culture.  More times than not, it is not an open book and signing session.  It is far more frequent for that Scoutmaster conference to deal with “Boy issues”.  Stuff that they just need to talk about.  To the outside eyes and ears that may sound a bit creepy, but in our unit Trust is high and sometimes there are just things you need to talk about with someone who you trust.  I have built that trust with our Scouts and their parents.
That trust is a huge part of our culture and comes from an unwavering commitment to the Scout Oath and Law.  Those are the rules of the Troop and those are the only rules.
I told you that there was a point here.  Yes, our Troop is not for everyone and often times our Scouts look to be arrogant or have a swagger about them.  That is true, however it is not arrogance, it is confidence.  We pride ourselves on skills development and staying true to the goals of Scouting.  We wrap all of that in our adventure and fun program.  I believe like Baden-Powell asked us as Scoutmasters to the heart of the boy and to be their friend.  That is why our Scouts would have that feeling that when I suggest it is cool.. it is.  I am not always right and do not seek the worship of these young men.  I will tell you quite honestly that I love it when they want to be adventurous.  I love to see them push their boundaries and step out of their comfort zone.  I love to see leadership in action, no matter how ugly it looks at times.  This has become our culture, this is our Troop.  I am sure that your Troop has its own culture and its own traditions and its own swagger.
Watch a Troop as it sings its Troop song or yell.  That will give you a peek into that Troops Culture.
This all started with a couple of Scouts talking about how they wish things were different.  My answer to them was simply this, If you want it to be different, change it.   Know my guys.. they will.
Have a Great Scouting Day!

Categories: Advancement, Backpacking, blog, camp skills, Camping, canoe, Character, Citizenship, Climbing, comments, fitness, High Adventure, Ideals, Journey to Excellence, Just fun, Leadership, Oath and Law, Order of the Arrow, Patrol Method, Scouting, Scoutmaster conference, Scoutmaster minute, Skills, teamwork, Values | Tags: , , | 1 Comment

Saturday Quick Tip

TOWToday we are talking about controlling your guy lines.  Whether you are a tent camper or sleep under a tarp you will have lines to control.
I hate it when lines are tangled and become a mess.  This simple way of controlling your lines is a perfect fix.  You can do this with gloves too which makes this a great way to get packed in the winter also.
As long as you can make a figure 8 with your fingers and know how to make a slippery half hitch.. you are good to go.
This tip will make your packing easier and when you get home to dry things out you will not have a mess of tangled lines everywhere.
If you have a tip or a skill that you would like to see drop me a note.
Thanks for coming to the blog.
Have a Great Scouting Day!

Categories: Backpacking, camp skills, comments, gear, Hammock, High Adventure, Just fun, Scoutmaster minute, Skills, training | Tags: , , , , | Leave a comment

Snow Peak 700 Review

sp700Well, It’s Sunday and today we are celebrating our Troops 10th Anniversary as well as Scouting’s 104th.  Every year our Troop hosts its annual Red and Green Dinner.  A celebration of the Troop and Scouting.  This year we will recognize former Troop members and have a great time looking back on the 10 years that got us where we are today.
Today, since my day is dedicated to the Troop’s Red and Green, I thought I’d share this gear review with you.
Quickly becoming my “Go to” pot/cook set again, I went away from it for some time in favor of the Imusa mug.  I still like the Imusa, it gives me some options in cooking namely the size of the pot that the Snow peak 700 does not.
For the size and weight though, it’s tough to find a better pot for backpacking and cooking single servings.
Enjoy the review, let me know what you think.  Drop us a comment.
Have a Great Scouting Day!

Categories: Backpacking, camp skills, Camping, Climbing, comments, Cooking, gear, High Adventure, reviews, Scoutmaster minute, Skills, Winter Camping | Tags: , , , , | Leave a comment

Saturday Quick Tip – Sleeping bag storage

TOWHere is your Saturday Quick tip.  This week we are talking about taking care of your sleeping bag.  The best way to store your sleeping by laying it flat.  But most of us just do not have that kind of room in our house, so the next best method of storing your sleeping bag is by hanging it.  This allows the air to circulate and keep the bag fresh as well as maintain the loft of the insulation.  It does not matter if it is synthetic or down, the insulation once crushed will tend to stay that way over time.  Crushed insulation will take longer to loft when needed and because synthetic fiber have memory, you will, over time lose much of the “R” value of your sleeping bag.
If you can not hang your gear, storing the bag in an over sized cotton bag is the way to go.  An extra-large pillow case or bag like that will do.  The point is get your bag out of the compression bag and let it air out and maintain its loft.
Remember, you paid a lot of hard-earned cash for that sleeping bag with the hope that it will be there for you when you want a nice comfortable sleep in the woods.  Take care of it and it will take care of you.
If you have comments or suggestions, I’d love to hear them.
Have a Great Scouting Day!

Categories: Backpacking, camp skills, Camping, comments, gear, Just fun, Motto, Scouting, Scoutmaster minute, Skills, training, Winter Camping | Tags: , , , , | Leave a comment

Frost Bite and Hypothermia

hypowrapWell, It snowed here in Oregon today.  The first real snow fall of the “Winter”.  And as much as we have already prepared for our winter camping experiences, the snow reminded me of the risk we accept when winter camping and more to the point the risk that we mitigate or manage through proper training and preparation.  First Aid is perhaps the most training we do to prepare for winter outings and we make sure that everyone going on the outing is versed in being prepared for cold weather injuries.
The scariest thing that I can think of in training first aid is Frost Bite and Hypothermia.  They can strike fast and have tremendous damaging effects if not prevented and once affected, treated.
As the snow fell today, I thought it would be good to refresh ourselves on those two cold weather injuries.
Frostbite mostly affects areas where the circulation is poor. Since cold weather will cause the body to take preventive measures by constricting (making smaller) the blood vessel, this opens the door to frostbite injuries.

Look for the 4 Ps of frostbite:
Pink – affected areas will be reddish in color. This is the first sign of frostbite.
Pain – affected areas will become painful.
Patches – white, waxy feeling patches show up – skin is dying.
Pricklies – the areas will then feel numb.

Tips to prevent frostbite:
Get to a warm area before frostbite sets in.  If it’s too cold outside, consider staying indoors.
Protect areas of poor circulation (ears, nose, fingers and toes).
Keep extra mittens and gloves in an area quickly accessible.
Wear larger sized mittens over your gloves.
Wear a scarf or gaiter to protect the chin, lips and cheeks. They are all extremely susceptible to frostbite.
Wear two pairs of socks – wool if possible
Keep feet warm and dry
Remove any wet clothing.

What to do in case of frostbite:
Do not rub or massage affected areas.  It may cause more damage.
NOT HOT – warm up the area slowly. Use warm compresses or your own body heat to re-warm the area. Underarms are a good place.
If toes or feet are frostbitten, try not to walk on them.
Seek immediate medical attention if you see white or grey colored patches or if the re-warmed area is numb.
Always be on the lookout for the symptoms of frostbite.  In case of serious cold weather injury, seek immediate medical attention.

Hypothermia
Whenever the body’s normal temperature becomes too low, hypothermia (hypo = low and thermia = temperature) occurs and will starve the brain of much-needed oxygen.  We experience hypothermia conditions when we engage in strenuous activity like hiking into camp, getting sweaty and then standing idle allowing the body to cool to fast.  During cold weather months, finding warmth can be the key to survival, but hypothermia can occur even during the hot days of July.  Swimming in cold water for a long period of time can induce hypothermia even in the hottest months of the year.  Remember, hypothermia can quickly become life-threatening.

Signs of Hypothermia
Look for the “UMBLES” from people affected by cold temperatures:
A person who mumbles;
A person who stumbles; and
A person who fumbles objects.

Tips to prevent Hypothermia
Wear clothes in layers: The under layer should be the insulating layer to prevent loss of your body heat while keeping the cold outside air away; the outer layer should be the “wind breaking” layer to reduce the chances of cold air reaching the insulating layer.
Drink warm fluids.
If you start to sweat, cool off a little. Wet clothes will accelerate other cold weather injuries.
Wear a hat – up to 40% of body heat loss can occur through the head.
Wear gloves or mittens or both!
Wear a scarf or gaiter to protect the chin, lips and cheeks – all are extremely susceptible to cold weather injuries.

What to do in case of Hypothermia
Remove wet clothing that promotes hypothermia.
Get to a warm place as soon as possible. Use several layers of blankets or sleeping bags, heated if possible.  Place the injured person in the Hypothermia Wrap.
If the person is alert, give warm beverages.
Seek immediate medical attention.
Always be on the lookout for signs of frostbite and hypothermia.  In case of serious cold weather injury, seek immediate medical attention.  Here is a quick video from Wilderness Medical Associates (WMA) that illustrates the Hypothermia Wrap.

BE PREPARED! We use the buddy system to watch out for each other! These two injuries are serious and can hurt you in the long-term.  Camping in the winter can be the funnest time of your Scouting life! But you have got to be prepared!

Hope that helps you in your preparation for your next winter outing.  I am glad that our guys pay attention, in 10 years of winter camping we have never had a cold weather injury.
Have a Great Scouting Day!

Categories: Backpacking, blog, camp skills, Camping, fitness, gear, High Adventure, Just fun, Leadership, Methods, Motto, planning, Risk Management, Scout, Scouting, Scoutmaster minute, Skills, training, Winter Camping | Tags: , , , , | 2 Comments

Saturday Quick Tip 2-1-14

TOWEvery Saturday, we are going to add a “Tip of the Week” to the Blog.  A tip that will be focused on Backpacking, camping, hiking, cooking, or other skills associated with the great outdoors.
This weeks tip is a simple one that will save wear and tear on your pack and keep your gear organized and clean.
Let me know if you have a tip you want to share.  Also, if you have ideas or tips that you have questions about or want to see.  Please let me know and I will do my best to put them up here.
In this tip I use a Marlin Spike hitch.. to learn how to tie the Marlin Spike, check this site out.  Animated Knots by Grog

Have a Great Scouting Day!

Categories: Backpacking, blog, camp skills, Camping, gear, High Adventure, Just fun, Methods, reviews, Scoutmaster minute, Skills, technology, Winter Camping | Tags: , , , , , , , | 4 Comments

J Falk Wood Burning stove

jfalkstoveFor those of you looking to play around with other stoves for backpacking you know that I have played around with a couple different Wood gas or Wood burning stoves.  I currently use the Solo Stove for wood burning, but I found this older video of my first shot at wood burning stoves. The J Falk Bushwhacker Stove is a nice stove that you should give a try.  Whether you make one or buy one, they are fun little stoves to play around with.  They are efficient and economical.  The stoves are safe and easy to make or buy. We have used them to fulfill the “Cook over open fire” requirement also… so give it a shot.  Here are the instructions for making your own Bushwhacker stove.  CLICK HERE
Have a Great Scouting Day!

Categories: Backpacking, blog, camp skills, Camping, Cooking, gear, High Adventure, Just fun, Scouting, Scouts, Skills | Tags: , , , , , | Leave a comment

Teriyaki Chicken

Back in 2009, I posted this recipe and a video on my YouTube channel.  Well since I have been consolidating the channel and working hard on Blog content, I stumbled on this recipe and the video on an old hard drive.  I retooled the video and thought this was a great meal for anyone on the trail.
So you might say that I am re-purposing recycling the post, but trust me this is a recipe that you will enjoy. So try this one.  You will love it.

Teriyaki Chicken
1 cup dry instant rice
1/2 tsp garlic powder
1/2 tsp ginger powder
1 pkg honey
2 pkg soy sauce
1 1/2 cups water
1 can or pouch of chicken
Before camp, mix all dry ingredients at home.  Store in a zip lock bag.
At Camp, boil water, add rice mixture.  After the rice is cooked, stir in Chicken, honey, and sauce.  This makes 1 serving, so do the math and multiply for your size of group.
Have a Great Scouting Day!

Categories: Backpacking, blog, camp skills, Camping, Cooking, High Adventure, Just fun, Leave no trace, Methods, Motto, reviews, Skills | Tags: , , , , , | Leave a comment

Using Evernote ™ for Scouting

Evernote_Icon_256One of my goals for this year and in particular in working on the blog is to use tools to be more successful.  There is nothing worse than a goal that is not attainable because of lack of want to or know how and sometimes tools can assist in making a goal more attainable.
A new years resolution to go to the gym only works while the motivation to work out is there.  Going to the gym and not working out because you don’ t know how only discourages you and you don’t go back.
I am one of “those people” that needs constant motivation to stay on track.  I do that by motivating myself and finding tools and resources that keep me focused and on task.
For example.  I am working on doing more to lift some of the burden of household chores from my wife.  She does and has done a fantastic job over the past 22 years and I know this is an area that I can do better at.  So I have picked up the responsibility to doing the grocery shopping.  I hate grocery shopping, but it is a task that I can do so I had to find motivation (other than just being more helpful).  So I dove into the task to find tools that would make grocery shopping more interesting for me and make me want to do it.  Enter an app for my phone.  I downloaded the Out of Milk app and started using it.  We make the grocery list on the computer and sync it with my phone.  Bingo.. we have a winner.  I am actually finding grocery shopping fun, walking up and down the isles scanning products and adding them to the shopping cart.
Apps and software have made much of what we do these days more tolerable.  They have also made managing tasks, lists, notes, and resources more accessible.  A few years back I started using an app called Evernote ™.  It was a cool way to take notes and have them available across different platforms.  My computer, phone, tablet etc.  Then I started using for Scouting.
Some of the cool things about Evernote ™ that I really like are the note taking and sharing of information I gather.  With Evernote ™ I can clip and save things right from the internet.  I can save PDF files for retrieval later and I can record voice notes.
Evernote ™ has all of this in one nice bundle.  I have many notebooks within Evernote ™.  This is nice to I stay organized and have everything right at the tip of my fingers.
evernotescreenshotOur Troop uses Troopmaster ™ to manage the Troop’s administrative functions.  But Troopmaster ™ does not have a corresponding app for my phone or a mobile way of accessing information from Troopmaster ™.  So I save the reports and most frequently used items from Troopmaster ™ as PDF files and drop them into Evernote ™.  I can’t tell you many times we have been at a Scout property and they need a roster with phone numbers, ages, etc.  I just open up Evernote ™ and there it is.  I can even print the roster from Evernote ™ if they have wireless printing available.  I had to do this last summer at summer camp.
Scoutmaster conferences are easily tracked and noted using Evernotes voice memo feature.  It is nice to talk with a Scout and then capture some of my thoughts right after we are finished without sitting a writing it all down.  Then once I get home I can transcribe the voice memo into a note for future reference.
Project planning is another great use for Evernote ™.  In 2012 I used Evernote ™ to plan and track our Philmont trek.  Everything from setting reminders to making checklists to ultimately making notes along the journey.  Adding pictures to remind me of tasks, people, places, and things we needed to do.
As most everything we get now electronically from the BSA comes in PDF format, dropping our reservations and other correspondence from Philmont was easy to save and retrieve.
I am still learning of new features and ways to use Evernote ™, but so far it is a great tool to make my Scouting life and my personal life more organized.  It is a way that I stay focused and on task and therefore more productive.
Some of the other ways in which I use Evernote ™:
workflowBuilding Packing list for Backpacking.  It is a nice way to make checklists and track weight and gear.
Lists for places I want to go.  Using the clip it feature on the web I can save maps, brochures, and information about places I want to go, in particular backpacking.
Saving ideas for future planning with the Patrol Leaders Council.
Recipes for Dutch oven or backpacking meals.
Using Evernote ™ Hello I save business card and meeting information.  That is really a neat feature and a fast and easy way to build and maintain contact lists.
That’s just a few.  I follow the Evernote Blog also.  It is amazing all of the different ideas shared there for use cases, tips, and what’s happening with Evernote ™.
Finding a good way to stay motivated and on task is important. It is critical if you are like me and have many irons in the fire and want to stay focused.  But like everything else if you don’t commit to using the tools then you as good as that new years resolution to go to the gym.
I hope that helps you find a tool that will help you manage your irons in whatever fire you place them.
Let me know what you use.
Have a Great Scouting Day!

Categories: Advancement, Backpacking, blog, camp skills, comments, Cooking, High Adventure, Journey to Excellence, Just fun, Leadership, Methods, Motto, Philmont, reviews, Scouting, Scoutmaster conference, Scoutmaster minute, Skills, Summer Camp, technology | Tags: , , , , , , , , , | 1 Comment

Blog at WordPress.com. The Adventure Journal Theme.

UltraLight Backpacking or Bust!

Cutting Pounds One Ounce at a Time

David's Passage

Outdoor Video Blog

QBQ!

Be Outstanding Through Personal Accountability

Girly Camping®

It's Not Just For Boys...

STORIES of TROOP 175

Camping and Events

Hanging On The Trail

Planning and completing a 2014 Appalachian Trail thru-hike

Mr. Harrison's Blog

Just another WordPress.com weblog

Leader Daze

Life, Camp, and Scouting

Boys' Life magazine

Play challenging online games, laugh at funny jokes, build amazing projects and find lots of fun at the online home of Boys\' Life, the official youth magazine for the Boy Scouts of America.

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 1,140 other followers

%d bloggers like this: