Author Archives: Scoutmaster Jerry

He is Risen!

He is risenI just wanted to take this moment in your life to wish you a very Blessed Easter.
It is in the Resurrection of Jesus Christ that we have Hope.
His Life, Death, and Resurrection is perhaps the most significant historical event in the world.  For the believer and non believer alike this day changed the world.
Today as we celebrate with wonderful meals and time spent with family let this be a reminder of the example set by our Lord.  Being a Selfless Servant Leader.
Have a Wonderful Easter. 

Categories: blog | Tags: , | 1 Comment

Planning a Backpacking Trek pt. 1

philmontmap1.jpgWhether it is for your Scout Troop or you are heading out into the wilderness by yourself or with buddies there are some things that need to be planned before you go.  To get the most of your backpacking experience if you follow a few steps, you won’t forget something and will set yourself up for a worry free backpack trek.
First.  Figure out where you want to go.  Once you do some online research or hit a few guide books and talk to friends, pick a trek.  Next, and way before you get your heart set on the amazing adventure.. Get the map or maps for that section of trail.  Do an exhaustive map recon of the trip.
During your map check look for:
Trail head location.  Can you get there and are there facilities at the trail head?  Restrooms, safe parking, water?
If you are making your trek a loop, can you get in and get out at that trail head or do you need to move the car to a different location and shuttle to the trail head.  This would apply for an in and out hike too.  You may need to check with local guides for shuttles, but you better plan for it or you will find yourself in a pickle real quick.
Look on the map for camp locations along the route.  What is the water availability along the way and in camp locations?
What is the terrain like.  Check out those contour lines… Don’t be surprised once you get on the trail.
This is a great time to learn to really read map detail.  You should know the trail so well from studying the map that you recognize the terrain and land marks as you hike it.
This is also the time where you plan for bail outs.  Locations on the map that will allow you to get out if the weather turns south or someone in the party gets hurt.  Road intersections, crossing trails and mile markers that will allow for quick decision-making when out on the trail.
Now that you have your map and you know where you want to go and see, how far do you want to make the trek.  You will need map in hand to figure this one out also.  Your distance will determine a lot in the trip planning.
How far can you go each day?  How many days are you going to be out on the trail?  Based on the trail, how far can you push or relax daily?    What is the trail like and how difficult?  This will determine how far you may get each day and how far you will want to go total.   But there may be a certain location or destination that you are looking at getting to.  How far do you need to go to get there and answer all the questions that we listed above.
Also consider the time of year you are heading out.  Crowds, snow, and closures are all things to consider.  You need to make sure that you have appropriate permits for the area that you are heading into and think about your group size.
I am a big fan of trekking to a destination.  Mileage means far less to me than seeing something cool.
Planning using your map will get you started on a great backpacking trip.  In our next post we will talk about gear selection and what to bring.  In the next few post we will discuss food, problems, and preparation for a long trek.
Thanks for reading the blog.
Have a Great Scouting Day!

Categories: Backpacking, camp skills, Camping, Just fun, Leave no trace, planning, Risk Management, Skills, training | Tags: , , | Leave a comment

Training, Nature or Nurture

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAThe other day I posted my thoughts on training.  I received some great feedback and feel that I need to address a couple of the comments, specifically a question that came up about the leaders themselves in the unit and how our attitude toward training is part of the reason we have great trained leaders.
Bob asked, “I’m curious as to whether you find that this “going the extra mile” is primarily something that a leader brings to the unit (nature), something that the unit brings to the leader (nurture), or some combination of the two.  Or, to put the question another way, do you find that the adults that volunteer for leadership positions already have that “going the extra mile” mentality, or that the culture of the unit inspires a new (or existing) leader to go that extra mile?”
Thanks Bob the answers is simple.  All of the above.
I believe that it is a bit of both Nature and Nurture.  First, I think that our unit has built a culture of trained leaders and an expectation that leaders are trained.  We ask a lot of our adult volunteers.  It is the nature of the unit that we expect the adult to be willing to “go that extra mile”.  Because it is a cultural thing or part of the nature of our unit, the volunteer knows what he or she is stepping in to.  It is not a surprise when they ask that they will be given a list of training courses, materials, and expectations of what training in our unit looks like.  If an adult leader expects to do the minimum, they are quickly encouraged to participate in some position other than that of a direct contact leader.
The culture of the unit dictates that in order to deliver the  very best program to our youth, keeping them safe, and instructing them properly we need to do better than the training that is provided by the Boy Scouts of America.
We agree that the training provided by the BSA is designed for the common denominator and not adequate for high adventure, advanced leadership, and activities that take you more than an hour away from a car.  This is all well and good, but in our opinion we need to do more.  Maxing the minimum is not good enough.
We ask of the Scout to “Do his Best”… so should we.
We also Nurture our adult leaders to want to be “Over Trained”.  Again, this is part of the culture of the unit.  Firm expectations of the training that allows our unit to function at a higher level.  When a parent asks to become a part of the adult leadership of the unit, the parent is invited to participate fully.  But training comes first.  Before an Assistant Scoutmaster for example can function as such, he must complete all of the BSA required training.  He needs to seek advanced first aid training to include CPR/AED.  We ask them to attend Wood Badge.  We take the time to instruct them on being a mentor, teacher, and coach to our Scouts.  We remind them that we do not lead, we assist.  There are not patches in the Boy Scout program for adults that say the word “Leader”.
This nurturing and development of the new adult volunteer leads them toward advanced training.
What this does for the unit is simple.  It opens doors.  We need not rely on any outside instruction or guides for our activities.  If we want to climb, we have certified climbing instructors to facilitate that activity.  Water craft, backpacking, shooting, Orienteering, Pioneering, First Aid, and more are all on the table because of the adult cadre of volunteers that have become the culture of the unit.  We also find that the adults stay active, even when the Scout has moved on.  This level of commitment has kept our knowledge base growing and stable.  The culture of the unit dictates that we do it all for the Scouts and we go the extra mile to make sure they have the very best Scouting experience.
So it is both Nature and Nurture.  It is a culture that expects the adult to set the example by giving more.  Being a model of the expected behavior of a servant leader.  One that reinforces our 5 Leadership principles in the Troop.
Leading ourselves, Focusing on the small stuff, Being the model of expected behavior, Communicating effectively, and being a Servant Leader.
Once that culture is developed and has a strong by in, the unit will flourish with trained leaders.
Allan and Alex, I hope that answer addressed your questions also.
If you have more questions, comments of concerns, please feel free to drop me a note.
Have a Great Scouting Day!

Categories: Advancement, Backpacking, camp skills, Camping, Character, Citizenship, Climbing, comments, Cooking, gear, Good Turn Daily, High Adventure, Ideals, Journey to Excellence, Just fun, Leadership, Leave no trace, Patrol Method, Risk Management, Scouting, Scoutmaster minute, Scouts, Service, training | Tags: | Leave a comment

Qualified, Trained Leaders

trainednewWe often talk about having all of our adult leaders trained.  When we speak of training we are talking about the basics.  Has the adult completed Youth Protection?  Attended their Basic Course for the specific position?  And according to the Boy Scouts of America, that’s pretty much a trained leader.
You are qualified to be an adult that delivers the promise of Scouting.  Really.
Ok, now… everyone just take off your Scouting hat and put on your parent hat.  Now you know nothing about Scouting except that your son wants to be a Scout.  You know that Scouting is a great organization that reinforced those character traits that you are teaching at home and he and his friends enjoy going camping once a month.  But who is this “Trained” leader?  What qualifies him to take your son out into the woods?
A couple videos?  An online training session and a “suitable for framing” print out certificate?
That’s it.
Oh, but maybe the leader has been to Wood Badge.  So he knows the Boy Scout Program and is able to teach and reach his goals.  He communicates well, but what of the skills he needs to take my kid into the woods.
My point here is this.  In a world in which we bubble wrap our kids.  We don’t let them stay out after dark, they can’t climb trees, drink from a garden hose, or in some cases even push a lawn mower.. we drop off our sons to people we don’t really know, they hop into their trucks and vans and drive away for a weekend in the woods.
Say that out loud and it is a bit creepy.
We trust that they know what they are doing with our kids.  We hope to see smiles on their faces and that they are in one piece when they arrive back at the meeting hall.
Trust.  That is what we have in our leaders.  But it’s 2014 so what has he done to be trusted.  What skills does he have to gain my trust.  Who is this guy taking my kid into the woods?
I am a big fan of Boy Scout Training and take it a step further.  I am on our district training team and teach the Scoutmaster basic course.  I am a Wood Badge staffer and love to teach leadership.
So knowing what I know, I know that the Boy Scout minimum training is not enough to build that trust.  But the leader that goes the extra mile and gets more training, now that’s the guy I want.
Not to toot my horn, or the horns our leaders in my Troop, but we respect that trust and that is why we all go the extra mile.
In our Troop, all the Assistant Scoutmasters are Wood Badge trained.
We have Certified Climbing instructors.
We have Certified Wilderness First Aid First Responders.
We have Wilderness First aid trained leaders.
COPE instructors
White water rafting guides
Leave No Trace master trainers
Kayak guides
Cold Weather camping experts
Backpacking experts
Pioneering instructors
Leadership trainers
Everyone is CPR/AED trained
Everyone has done the supplemental training for Trek Safe, Safe Swim defense, Safety Afloat, and Climb Safely.
I know that I am missing something, the point is that we go out of our way to be over trained.
This is where the trust of the parents is gained and maintained.
It is an important part of protecting our youth and delivering the very best program to them.
So who is your Scout leader?  Do you trust him or her with your son in the woods?
Have a Great Scouting Day!

Categories: Backpacking, camp skills, Camping, Character, Citizenship, Climbing, High Adventure, Journey to Excellence, Just fun, Leadership, Methods, Motto, Oath and Law, planning, Scouting, training, Values, Wood Badge, Youth Protection | Tags: | 3 Comments

Scouting family takes pilgrimage to Baden-Powell’s grave in Kenya

Scoutmaster Jerry:

Fantastic Trip..

Originally posted on Bryan on Scouting:

Tracing the life of Scouting founder Robert Baden-Powell takes you not only to his birthplace in London but also to Kenya, where he spent the last few years of his life.

My recent trip to London and Gilwell Park, provenance of the Wood Badge training course, inspired Idaho Scouter Steve Jung to share photos and stories from a similar Scouting pilgrimage.

And I’m sure glad he shared.

The Jung family traveled to Kenya, the East African nation where B-P died on Jan. 8, 1941, at age 83. His grave is now a national monument.

Steve, along with his wife, Becky, and daughter, Anna, visited B-P’s final resting place, the cemetery museum and his home in Nyeri, Kenya.

“Our trip to Kenya was a most memorable one,” Steve says. “We did some backcountry hiking and a lot of touring. We went caving and places most public  people don’t go or know about. Just a terrific trip.”

See…

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The Road

roadsI can not remember where or who I heard this from, but I recalled a quote the other day that I thought was a good way of illustrating our job as Scout leaders and parents.
“We are not building roads for our children, we are building children for the roads.”
Essentially it is saying that we can lay out everything to make life easy for our kids or we can prepared them for the road of life, which we all know is not easy.
When I thought about this quote, it got me to thinking about some of the ways we discuss our Scouting programs.  As you all know I am a fan of traditional Scouting and doing things the right way.  I am not a fan of giving everyone a trophy and I know that not every Scout will be an Eagle Scout… nor should they be.  If they have been properly trained in their young lives to work hard, then they will reap the rewards of hard work.
The road of life is difficult and only made easier by getting on it and traveling.  Know that it is hard, but stay the course.  The beauty of the road is that you get to pick your destination.   You can pick the path of least resistance and when you get there you will find that it took you to a place a fewer rewards.  You can get on the highway of success and its direction will lead you to the world of Success.  But you need to know that there will be detours and pot holes, but if you negotiate them, you will be successful.
So as Scout leaders and parents we need to encourage our children to take that road and prepare them for the detours and pot holes.  We do not need to drive them there with the knowledge of the location of the pot holes and hardships.  You can build the road, nice and smooth.  Pave it with gold and make it a fast lane for your child, but he will not get the most out of it and will fail to learn lessons along the way.
On the other hand, we can train him up to set a course, know how to go around a detour and take it slow on a pot hole filled road.  He will learn and develop and by the time he gets where he is going he will be a man who you will be proud of.
Last night at Round table I had a little chat with a Scouter about Eagle Scouts.  He made the comment that every Scout should be an Eagle Scout and that the sooner they get it, the better.
Again, I thought about the road.  Did we build the road for the Scout or did we build the Scout for the road.  I don’t know the answer in his particular case, but how many Eagle Scouts have we seen that are not prepared for the road.  I personally can tell you that I have seen many.  While I am proud of their accomplishment, I wonder if we as Scouters are not quick to reward and less enthusiastic to take the time and build that young man.
The road of life is a tough one.  We owe it to our children and our Scouts to build them ready for the road of life.
Have a Great Scouting Day!

Categories: Advancement, blog, Character, Citizenship, comments, Ideals, Journey to Excellence, Leadership, Methods, Motto, Oath and Law, Scout, Scouting, Scoutmaster minute, Skills, Values | Tags: , , | 4 Comments

Emotional Gauntlet

Every 15 minute bannerThe blog has been a little quiet the last couple days as we have been through an emotional gauntlet over the last week.  On Monday night right before the Troop meeting we were visited by two Police Officers from the Gresham Police Department.  They asked my wife and I to come inside and sit down.  We were informed that our youngest son Josh had been in a fatal car accident.  He was struck head on by a drunk driver and was killed instantly.  His girlfriend, who was in the car with him was transported to OHSU (Oregon Health and Science University) and was in critical care.  The drunk driver was unharmed and under arrest.  The Officer informed us that the coroners officer would release Josh to us in about 48 hours.
My heart shattered.
Yesterday, my wife and I spoke at the High School at their “Every 15 Minutes” assembly.  We shared the feelings and a few thoughts on the impact of Drunk and Impaired Driving.  It was an emotional and devastating message.  During the assembly a group of Seniors put on a skit.  In that skit there is a party and one of their classmates decides to get behind the wheel and drive home, clearly intoxicated.  He and his girlfriend are in a fatal accident, this time the girlfriend is killed.  A field sobriety test is given and the young man is found guilty of driving under the influence and vehicular manslaughter.  He is placed in hand cuffs and taken off stage.  This visual is stunning to the audience, his classmates.  Teresa and I are then invited to the stage to say our comments and in the darkness of the auditorium our son Josh appears and we are reunited.  I lost it.
Josh is a part of the student group that hosted this event and we agreed to help.  We knew, in our minds, that Josh was safe.  Monday night, the Police took him and the rest of the group to a local hotel where they stayed the night apart from family and friends.  We were the only parents contacted by the Police and informed of the accident, but all of the students in the program were “killed” by drunk drivers or drunk themselves when they were in a traffic accident.
The program is called “Every 15 Minutes”.
In the United States every 15 minutes someone is killed because of drunk or intoxicated driving.  This weekend is the Prom and the message was sent loud and clear that we do not want our kids to be the next one to be killed needlessly.  Drunk driving is a selfish act.  The self-centered idiot that makes the choice to get behind the wheel of a car and put our lives in danger needs to understand the impact of their actions.
Monday evening, even though I knew it was not real, my world stopped spinning.  Emotionally I could not process the difference between a high school program and reality.  It hurt.
It has taken till this morning to fully process this.
I never want that to happen to me again, and I never want it to happen to you.
Every 15 minutes in America someone we love is killed for nothing.
Have a Great Scouting Day!

Categories: blog | Tags: | 8 Comments

Ask the Scout Executive

>#100DaysofScouting -100 Days of ScoutingOver my many years as a Scouter both at the Cub Scout level and the Boy Scout level, I have often heard folks grip about one thing or another when it comes to our paid Scouters.  I have sat in “town hall” or fire side chats with Scout Executives and other paid Scouters and bar none, they always become sessions that are filled with finger-pointing and questions that put the Scout Executive on the hot seat.  Some times deserved, but often times, just a forum to let them have it.
I have a pretty good relationship with our Scout Executive and see eye to eye with him on many issues that effect our Council.
So here you go… if you could sit with a Scout Executive, what would you ask?
List your questions in the comment section and I will do my best to get answers for you.
Note… this is not just for my local council.. I am sure that issues are pretty much the same all over.
So what do you want to know from the top?
Maybe if this works, we will head to Irving for the next round.
And go…

Have a Great Scouting Day!

Categories: blog, comments, Just fun, Leadership, Scouting | Tags: | 5 Comments

Conservative Values?

scoutlawbelieveitThe other day I got into a debate or more a less a discussion about Scouting and it’s Values with a co-worker of mine.  He contended that Scouting was too conservative in its values and that is what makes it unappealing in the Portland area.   He debated that conservative values don’t work well in America today as we are moving toward a Country that is more about the people.  Now, I don’t know what the heck that means and I won’t go into the whole debate, but what it did cause me to do was argue the point of values to my co-worker.  The basis of that argument was the difference between Conservative values and I suppose we would have to argue Liberal values as they would be the opposites of one another.
This is not a political discussion.  We are only talking about values here, but since he brought up the word “Conservative” I had to have an opposing side to compare with.
To make the debate not one of emotion or politics, I stuck with the basics.  Where do we get our values and what are our values in Scouting.  How we apply our values is up to the individual, but it is fair to say that in an organization like the Boy Scouts of America, our shared values become a part of our lives and we should not separate the Scouting life from every day life.
Scouting gets it values from the Scout Oath and Law, the motto and Slogan, and Outdoor code.
Lets start with the Scout Oath.  The Oath is the foundation promise of the organization.  It is the jumping off point that the individual takes an oath to “On his honor” he will live the following values.  He makes three promises in the Scout Oath.  He makes a promise to do his Duty to his God and his Country.  He makes a promise to help other people at all times.  And he makes a promise to himself, to keep himself physically strong, mentally awake, and morally straight.  This promise lays the ground work for the way he is going to live his life.  So lets see, those three promises are conservative?  Then what do Liberals think and believe?
Let’s move on to the meat and potatoes of our values, the Scout Law.
A Scout is trustworthy, loyal, helpful, friendly,courteous, kind, obedient, cheerful, thrifty, brave, clean, and reverent.  12 words that define how we should live our lives.  Conservative?  If so are liberals not trustworthy, loyal, helpful etc?  Is it wrong that we want our Scouts to grow up living those values, after all, does not all of those 12 values lead America to a better place?  Is it wrong that we want our Scouts to develop good habits of service to others and being courteous?  Have you been to a mall in anywhere America lately.  We need more Scouts is all I am saying.  If rude, unkind, sad, and filth is this new America we are looking for then we are getting there quick.
What about thrifty?  Don’t we want our Scouts to develop good habits when it comes to money and how they handle it.  Don’t we want them to know that they have a responsibility to pay their own way and not be a drain on society.  Now that I will concede is a conservative point of view.  Scouts should never be looking for a hand out or to become a part of the welfare state.  Scouts should work hard and provide for themselves and their families and should not settle for other people paying their way.
So the Scout Law is our shared values that lead us to being better people and better members of society.
And what about the Outdoor code.  Those four requirements to be Clean in my outdoor manners, careful with fire, considerate in the outdoors and conservation minded.  Yep, they hurt us as Americans.  Those crazy conservative values that direct us to being better in when it comes to our time spent in outdoors and our stewardship to the land.
Now those of us that have been in and around Scouting long enough know that we derive our mission statement from our values and core beliefs.
To refresh our memories and to help my coworker see just how conservative our values are here is the mission statement of the Boy Scouts of America:   The mission of the Boy Scouts of America is to prepare young people to make ethical and moral choices over their lifetimes by instilling in them the values of the Scout Oath and Scout Law.  Hmmm… moral and ethical choices over their lifetimes.  What the heck are we thinking?  That is way to conservative.
How about the Vision statement of the Boy Scouts of America:  The Boy Scouts of America will prepare every eligible youth in America to become a responsible, participating citizen and leader who is guided by the Scout Oath and Scout Law.  Every eligible youth to become a responsible citizen?  That is just conservative crazy talk and can lead to no good.  I think the part that scares the liberal-minded in the vision statement is the word LEADER.
So what is the point here?
This started as a debate about conservative values and the closer we look into them they are just good values.  What scares me is this.  If this is what we consider conservative, what the heck is the opposite?  What are liberals thinking?
I would think these are American Values and we should want every American to live them.
As this debate got me thinking, I did a quick Google search and came on this.  Thought it was worth your time to review.  Values of Americans.  Take a look at that and see that Scouting and it’s values do make a difference.
The point is simply this.  It is not political unless you make it that way.  If Scouting;s values are conservative than conservative is the right way to live.  Until I see liberal values that match those strong values that make good citizens that can make good choices and hold themselves to a standard of service to others and self-determination.  Being people who are not going to be a burden on society, rather people who are willing to work hard and make a contribution.  In short… Men of Character.
Now I am not saying that folks on the left lack Character.  What I am saying is that Character matters more when we look at the values of the Boy Scouts of America coupled with the mission and vision of the organization.  What I am saying is that if any of those values are wrong then we have some serious problems and I have major problems with the opposite of Conservative.
It is an interesting debate and the further we get into it the deeper understanding of how people like my coworker think the more I realize that we need more Scouts and people who are Scout like in America.
And now you know one of the reasons that I end each post with…
Have a Great Scouting Day!

Categories: Character, Citizenship, Good Turn Daily, Ideals, Leadership, Scout Law, Scouting, Scouts, Service | Tags: , , | 9 Comments

Learn to Lead Yourself

lead-learn-word-cubesI have spoken about the five principles of leadership that we use in our Troop to develop both our Junior Leaders as well as our Adult Leaders.
To recap, those five principles are Learn to Lead Yourself,  Focus on the little things, Model Expected Behavior, Communicate Effectively, and Be a Servant Leader.
In this post we are going to focus on the first of these principles, Learn to Lead Yourself.
Simply put, if you can not lead yourself you can not lead others.
To illustrate this point we talk often about the way you act.  You set an example of what you would like in those that follow you.  You, as a leader can not get away with the “Do as I say and not as I do” philosophy of leading.  It just does not work if you are trying to be a good leader.
The way in which you carry yourself, your habits,and your skills show the follower that you are a leader that is worthy of following.
You pack your pack correctly and assist others in getting theirs right.
You take your promise to live the Scout Oath and Law in your daily lives seriously.  This is important in showing those you lead that you do not compromise in your values and you are consistent in the way you act and expect them to act.
Thomas J. Watson, the former chairman of IBM, said, “Nothing so conclusively proves a man’s ability to lead others as what he does from day-to-day to lead himself.”
Learning to Lead Yourself takes work.  The learning part comes in developing those skills, attitudes, and habits that make you a better leader.
This means that you spend time in the study of leadership.  It means that you take extra time to be trained in skills and develop methods of instruction to help others.
It means that you never stop learning, this becomes a habit.  Once developed you long for more learning and skills development.
This goes for youth and adults alike.
I know many Scouters that will do training because they have to and I know Scouters that do training because they want to.  They see value in adding to their skill sets in the bigger picture of how they deliver the promise of Scouting.
I also have seen this in our youth.  Youth that seek more adventure and know that they must develop that knowledge base before they can execute certain skills and tasks.  On the other hand, leadership is just a block to be signed on the way to Eagle Scout.
This concept of learning to lead yourself is nothing new.  It has been taught for years by leadership guru’s and is a foundation of leadership development.  It is a means of focusing on the leadership qualities that we need in order to be effective leaders.  Think about what you want to see in a leader.
You want the leader to be Trustworthy.  You want the leader to be reliable.  You want the leader to be accountable.  The leader should demonstrate integrity.  Well, if those are the things that you want in a leader, you need to focus your learning, habits, and attitudes to becoming that person… that leader.
Like I said before, if you can not lead yourself, you can not lead other people.
So how do we learn to lead ourselves?
First.  Find out who you are.  What kind of leader are you?  What habits do you currently have?  What are your skill sets that contribute to your leadership?
These may be hard questions to answer.  You may not like what you hear, either from yourself or others.  Find a leader that you trust and appreciate.  Ask them to assist you with these questions.
Second.  Find out what skills you need to develop to be an effective leader.  Make a list and a commitment to mastering those skills.  Take extra training and opportunities to learn and practice those skills.  Make changes in your habits and attitudes to get better at leadership and skills.
Third.  Commit to be a life long learner.  You need to always stay a couple of steps ahead of those you lead.  Get out in front with learning, practicing, and sharpening your leadership skills.  There is always something new and there are always way to improve.  Perfection is a curious thing.  It is something that can be seen, but moves farther away as you get closer.  It forces us to get better.  Shoot for perfection in leadership with the knowledge that I can not reach it, but the closer I get, the better I get.
Be patient but persistent.  Stay focused on making yourself better and those that you lead will be better.
The first step in effective leadership is getting the leader right.  That leader is you.  Learn to lead yourself and you will be on your way to being an effective leader.
Have a Great Scouting Day!

Categories: blog, Character, Ideals, Journey to Excellence, Leadership, Methods, Oath and Law, Scouting, Scoutmaster minute, Scouts, Service, Skills, training, Values | Tags: , | 1 Comment

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